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e-Book Model Rebels: The Rise and Fall of China's Richest Village download

e-Book Model Rebels: The Rise and Fall of China's Richest Village download

by Bruce Gilley

ISBN: 0520225333
ISBN13: 978-0520225336
Language: English
Publisher: University of California Press; First Edition edition (February 5, 2001)
Pages: 236
Category: Politics and Government
Subategory: Sociology

ePub size: 1670 kb
Fb2 size: 1613 kb
DJVU size: 1674 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 519
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The meteoric rise and fall of China's most famous village, Daqiu, and its audacious former boss, Yu Zuomin, provides a cautionary tale of the perils and pitfalls of 'getting rich quick' in post-reform China.

The meteoric rise and fall of China's most famous village, Daqiu, and its audacious former boss, Yu Zuomin, provides a cautionary tale of the perils and pitfalls of 'getting rich quick' in post-reform China. In this outstanding book, Bruce Gilley turns a powerful microscope on Daqiu, skillfully rendering its story as a first-class political thriller.

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Bruce Gilley (born 1966) is professor of political science at Portland State University Model Rebels: The Rise and Fall of China's Richest Village. University of California Press, 2001.

Bruce Gilley (born 1966) is professor of political science at Portland State University. He is a specialist in the comparative politics of China and Asia, a theorist of political legitimacy, and an advocate of viewpoint diversity and academic freedom. Fifteen members of the journal's board resigned as a result of the affair.

A growing campaign of political resistance led to increasing tensions between the villagers and the Chinese state, and eventually, in an event that made headlines around the world, an armed confrontation between the village and higher authorities backed by paramilitary police brought Yu Zuomin and his village crashing down.

Home Issues China Perspectives No. 38 Bruce Gilley, Model Rebels

Home Issues China Perspectives No. 38 Bruce Gilley, Model Rebels. Bruce Gilley, Model Rebels. The Rise and Fall of China’s Richest Village. As noted above, the book is really about the rise and fall of Yu and in the afterword, Gilley notes how economic growth has continued after Yuís dismissal and the attempts to curb the conglomerate and to restore Party rule. Importantly, Gilley draws on the work of Lin Nan to show how important subsequent ownership changes have been resulting in privatisation in all but name. This is the next revolution in the countryside and we need to understand this process more carefully.

China's new rulers: The secret files. Univ of California Press, 2001. China's new rulers: The secret files.

China Perspectives 57: 23 – 31. 62. Lee, Ching Kwan. Against the law: labor protests in China's rustbelt and sunbelt. Berkeley: University of California Press. Made in China ’ : Politics of Labor, Law, and Legitimacy. Woodrow Wilson Centre Asia Special Report 124: 9 – 11. 64. Pun, Ngai. The Succession to Mao and the End of Maoism, 1969 – 82. In The politics of China: the eras of Mao and Deng, ed. MacFarquhar, 256 – 75. New York: Cambridge University Press.

A portentous tale of rural rebellion unfolds in Bruce Gilley's moving chronicle of a village on the northern China plains during the post-1978 economic reform era. Gilley examines how Daqiu Village, led by Yu Zuomin, a charismatic Communist Party secretary and president of the local industrial conglomerate, became the richest village in China and a model for the rural reforms of the 1980s and early 1990s. A growing campaign of political resistance led to increasing tensions between the villagers and the Chinese state, and eventually, in an event that made headlines around the world, an armed confrontation between the village and higher authorities backed by paramilitary police brought Yu Zuomin and his village crashing down.
Comments:
Dominator
One of the most remarkable aspects of the reforms in rural China over the last thirty years has been the growth and transformation of Township and Village Enterprises, or TVEs. These industrial production units grew out of the ruins of the rural commune system (gongshe) introduced by Chairman Mao in 1955. Throughout the 1960s, communes were prohibited from devoting more than 15 percent of their labor to so-called sideline activities such as construction or light industry. But the loosening political atmosphere in the last days of the Cultural Revolution, coupled with a green revolution in the countryside and the neglect of rural industrial needs by state factories, prompted many rural leaders to set up factories. The old term for the firms, "brigade enterprises" (shedui qiye) was replaced in 1984 with a new one, "township and town enterprises" (xiangzhen qiye), later translated as "township and village enterprises" or TVEs.

Three things about TVEs stand out. First, their meteoric rise and development from rural workshop to multinational companies came up as a complete surprise to the Chinese authorities. The Chinese leadership launched rural reforms to solve the food shortage problem and to absorb some of the excess rural labor force. The growth of rural firms owed little to central policies, except the loosening of the commune system and the fiscal reforms that gave counties and townships an incentive to promote rural factories. The first TVEs were created to manufacture agriculture machinery, repair tools, and provide the local economy with building materials, hydroelectric power, and metal products. It was not a change engineered from above, but an institutional innovation emerging from below. At several junctures, TVEs had to face the critiques of the left wing faction of the Chinese Communist Party, which denounced widespread corruption and creeping capitalism in the countryside. But the importance of TVEs in China's national economy continued to grow apace. In the 1990s, in coastal provinces they had eclipsed state-owned entreprises in terms of output and export, and they have since become indistinguishable from private-owned companies.

Second, TVEs are a mix of private and collective ownership with ambiguous legal status. Local cadres, not private entrepreneurs, were the main agents of their development in the early phase of China's market transition. In due course, these public officials transformed themselves into swaggering executives and creamed off some of the enterprise's profit as their reward. The success of TVEs is a challenge to the school that identifies property rights and a transparent legal system as preconditions for the development of a market economy. Chinese capitalism often developed against the law: its actors were unruly, its processes unregulated, and its political oversight arbitrary. "If there was no such things as corruption, acknowledged a senior vice premier in Beijing, there would be no such thing as a TVE." But this doesn't mean that the Chinese market economy reverted to the law of the jungle: throughout the system, forms of cooperation emerged, based on ancient links of solidarity and nascent networks of reciprocity. China was able to "cross the river by feeling for the stones," as Deng Xiaoping once put it. State laws often validated these social arrangements after they had developed into robust solutions, allowing for experimentation and collective learning to take place.

The third lesson stemming from the TVE experiment is a reappraisal of rural areas and peasant leaders in Chinese transition and industrialization. The market economy in China didn't emerge only out of special economic zones and foreign direct investment in coastal provinces. There also was a homegrown version of the market economy that originated in rural areas and was driven by county hicks, not slender urban executives. Here one should not be misled by the terms 'rural' or 'village': some of the 'towns' which created TVEs at the beginning of the reform era now have more than half a million dwellers, and rural landscapes in already densely populated areas have given way to industrial parks and housing projects. Indeed, one of the major sources of enrichment for party cadres and local leaders has been through the selling of land assets for property development. Still, the development of TVEs and rural industrialization show that China's market transition was a homegrown phenomenon, with deep roots in local communities. Keeping peasants and rural folks on board and giving them some say in the decisions that affect them is therefore a key challenge for China's leadership, who cannot rely solely on urban dwellers and social elites.

Bruce Gilley's book Model Rebels: The Rise and Fall of China's Richest Village weaves these broad considerations into a narrative that centers on the model village of Daqiu and its charismatic leader, Yu Zuomin. He shows how, under visionary and sometimes authoritarian leadership, the village pursued reforms during the 1980s and early 1990s against the resistance of city bureaucrats and higher level party officials. Once a dirt-poor location whose peasants were rebutted for their boorish manners and lack of sophistication, it soon became "China's richest village", with villagers dressing in executive suites and dwelling in marble halls. But the village ran into trouble as its increasingly autocratic leader began to challenge and clash with higher-level authorities resulting in a brutal murder that in turn led to the sentencing of Yu and his associates to lengthy terms in prison. Although Yu Zuomin's personal flaws are not brushed aside, the book argues that he was put down for his willingness to stand up for the local people, validating the claim that "people are afraid of becoming famous for the same reason that pigs are afraid of becoming fat."

Although published by the University of California Press, which specializes in scholarly monographs and anthropological essays, Modern Rebels is not an academic book, and it falls short on the methodological rigor and theoretical backing that one would expect from an ethnographical account of a Chinese village. The author is a professional journalist, and he wrote the story of Daqiu with a clear goal in mind: to illustrate local resistance to central oppression, and to suggest that Chinese peasants would be much more well off if given the freedom to create wealth and set rules for themselves. The fact that the author has a political axe to grind does not particularly bother me: many scholars also have a political agenda, even though their inclinations rest more with anticapitalist forces and nonmarket forms of solidarity. But I would have expected a more balanced account of "the rise and fall of China's richest village": the story solely focusses on the village leader, Yu Zuomin, and largely leaves the other villagers out of the picture. It is written like the plot of a TV documentary, with flashbacks and close-up shots, not with the textual details and local embeddedness that only extended fieldwork can provide. Indeed, the story would have made a good movie, but I found it a disappointing read.

Gerceytone
Because of Mao Zedong's economic policies of the late 1950s, 30 million Chinese died of starvation. Most of Mao's policies were reversed after his death in1976, and by the early 1980s the Chinese economy had taken off. Some villages took the opportunity in China to set on various economic ventures. Bruce Gilley's "Model Rebels" is the story of Daqiu (pronounced "Da-chew"), which became the richest villages in China.
While his prose style can be better, Gilley has written a very enjoyable book that reads more like a novel and less like social or economic history. Before 1978, Daqiu was the poorest villages in its province. In fact, Gilley includes a common joke from the period:
Question: What's the best way to kill someone in Daqiu without getting caught?
Answer: Bash in his head with a brick. No Judge will ever believe that a person from Daqiu has enough money to own a brick. You are sure to be set free.
But in 10 years, Daqiu was producing 3 percent of China's steel. The villagers owned imported cars, had their own television cable system, and the village treasury held hundreds of millions of dollars.
Gilley doesn't just tell a story of economic growth, but also narrates many of the developments that occurred in the village alongside. The local village leader, Yu Zuomin, a visionary, who leads Daqiu through this economic miracle becomes a dictator and tries to take on the Chinese government. There is everything in this story from greed, corruption, and bribery to murders and cover-ups.

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