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e-Book BAD ELEMENTS: CHINESE REBELS FROM LA TO BEIJING: CHINESE REBELS FROM LA TO BEIJING download

e-Book BAD ELEMENTS: CHINESE REBELS FROM LA TO BEIJING: CHINESE REBELS FROM LA TO BEIJING download

by Ian Buruma

ISBN: 0297643134
ISBN13: 978-0297643135
Language: English
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (2002)
Pages: 382
Category: Social Sciences
Subategory: Sociology

ePub size: 1810 kb
Fb2 size: 1792 kb
DJVU size: 1701 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 290
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Ian Buruma studied Chinese in the Netherlands and cinema in Japan. He has spent many years in Asia, which he has written about in God's Dust, Behind the Mask, and The Missonary and the Libertine. He has also written Playing the Game, The Wages of Guilt, and Anglomania

Ian Buruma studied Chinese in the Netherlands and cinema in Japan. He has also written Playing the Game, The Wages of Guilt, and Anglomania.

Ian Buruma was born in the Netherlands. He studied Chinese literature in Leyden, and Japanese cinema in Tokyo. These dissidents represent 'the first principle of good governance: the freedom to be critical and in this respect, they are an example not just for China but for all of u. Among the most fascinating interviews are those with the Tiananmen rebels more than ten years after the bloody events.

Bad Elements: Chinese Re. .has been added to your Cart. Buruma (The Missionary and the Libertine) seeks out "the rebels" of Tiananmen to find out what happened to them and how they feel about the future of human rights in China. Buruma's study is both engaging and deeply informed.

Back in 2001, Ian Buruma, a Dutch China-hand and journalist, published Bad Elements: Chinese Rebels from Los Angeles to Beijing and this past summer seemed an appropriate time to pick up the book and read it. Buruma’s Bad Elements begins by looking at the Chinese. Buruma’s Bad Elements begins by looking at the Chinese dissidents – starting with China’s 1978 Democracy Wall Movement through the 1989. Chai Ling during the Tiananmen Protests. Tiananmen student activists – living a new life in the United States. His survey from Wei Jingsheng to Wang Dan and Chai Ling shows a group of people out of sorts in their adopted land

Ian Buruma is one such person.

Ian Buruma is one such person. Ian Buruma, Bad Elements. Chinese Rebels from Los Angeles to Beijing. London, Orion/Phoenix, 2003, 404 p. Jean-Philippe Béja. Translated from the French original by Peter Brown.

Is China's future to be fund amid the boisterous sleaze of an electoral cmpaign in Taiwan, or in the manoeuvres by which ordinary residents of Beijing quietly resist the authority of the state?

Who speaks for China? Is it the old men of the politburo or activists like Wei Jingshsheng, who spent eighteen years in prison for writing a emocratic manifesto? Is China's future to be fund amid the boisterous sleaze of an electoral cmpaign in Taiwan, or in the manoeuvres by which ordinary residents of Beijing quietly resist the authority of the state? These are among the questions that Ian Buruma poses in this enlightening and often moving tour of Chinese dissidence.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Bad Elements: Chinese Rebels from Los Angeles to Beijing as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

At each stop along the way Buruma interviews dissidents or former dissents from Chinese societies.

These dissidents represent 'the first principle of good governance: the freedom to be critical and in this respect, they are an example not just for China but for all of u. At each stop along the way Buruma interviews dissidents or former dissents from Chinese societies. Their stories do seem to blend into each other after a hundred pages or so.

Bad Elements: Chinese Rebels from Los Angeles to Beijing (2001).

Chinese Rebels from LA to Beijing
Comments:
Prorahun
Ian Buruma gives us a penetrating portrait of all kinds of modern Chinese rebels against authoritarianism ('A human being should have the right to choose his own destiny').
These dissidents represent 'the first principle of good governance: the freedom to be critical and in this respect, they are an example not just for China but for all of us.'
Among the most fascinating interviews are those with the Tiananmen rebels more than ten years after the bloody events. These dissidents are now more or less troubled men in exile, full of disillusion and desperation, even fleeing into religion, but still bickering with and criticizing their fellow travellers.
Although they showed enormous courage, the truth is that they were not really a threat for the regime. As Ian Buruma states rightly: 'The Communist government fears rebellious workers far more than students and intellectuals.'
This book contains a wealth of information on China and the Chinese Diaspora.
It contains painful interviews with victims of the Cultural Revolution who suffered horrifying tortures, as well as a harsh report on the Shenzhen zone and a correct evaluation of the Falun Gong movement.
The author sketches a terribly bleak picture of Singapore's dictator Lee Kuan Yew, who couldn't support the slightest criticism and who crushed even the mildest of his opponents.
He gives us also an excellent historical and actual portrait of Taiwan with the bloody Kuomintang invasion and the brutal dictatorship of Chiang Kai-shek.
One minus point: in his distinguished portrait of Tibet he fails to mention the fact that Tibetans were trained by the CIA as invasion troops for an attack on Mao's China.
With every report and interview, the author illuminates different aspects of the Chinese mentality (Confucianism, zige, xenophobia, self-loathing ...)
This book is a magisterial achievement and a must read for all those interested in the history of China.

TheFresh
For decision-makers in companies which are either doing business in China now or are planning to, this is a must read. Buruma examines various "bad elements" in China and elsewhere whose intransigence and (in several instances) corruption create serious barriers to communication and cooperation as well as to commerce with the western world. Viewed as a global market, the People's Republic of China offers business opportunities which are almost comprehensible. For those of us in democratic societies in which dissent is not only possible but protected by law, it is difficult to grasp the nature and extent of suppression of human rights which we so easily take for granted. Among dissenters, opinions vary as to the pace of reform by which to establish such rights. At one point in this brilliant book, Buruma discusses Dai Qing who can be described as a "go slow intellectual." She advocates patience and prudence, confident of eventual reforms. "One sees what she means, but the analysis is flawed. On the contrary, the raw emotions, the latent hysteria, the pent-up aggressions seething under the surface of Chinese life are the result of living a lie. As long as people speak cannot freely, nothing can be exposed to to the light of reason, and raw emotions will take over." Over the centuries, social reform in China has never been easy and often traumatic. After conducting interviews with several dozen "mavericks" and then reflecting upon what they have shared with him, Buruma seems skeptical that significant social reform can be achieved, given the opposition of various "bad elements." He may be right. There is also the possibility that one totalitarian dynasty will simply give way to another. In that event, to what extent will suppression of dissent be sustained? To what extent will such a new dynasty be more willing and able to accommodate new technologies, notably the Internet? Buruma asks these and other critically important questions. He and we await answers which will indeed have global implications: positive, negative, or more likely both.

Nuadabandis
The thread connecting the chapters in this book, several of which are adapted from Buruma's previously published writing, is the author's journey from free Los Angeles and thereabouts to unfree Beijing. At each stop along the way Buruma interviews dissidents or former dissents from Chinese societies. Their stories do seem to blend into each other after a hundred pages or so. There's the childhood of relative prosperity, the youthful recognition of a corrupt society, and the public expression of defiance, followed by arrest, imprisonment, and usually torture. The grisly repetition of fiendishly cruel punishments would be macabre if it weren't for Buruma's personal explanation for his curiosity: he wants to know if he and his generation in Europe could have borne such trials.
It is the personal element that makes this book as captivating as it is. We hear not only each dissident's words but also Buruma's reactions to them and sometimes arguments against them. His long experience in Asian affairs and understanding of Western and Asian societies make his thoughts as illuminating as the stories of the dissidents themselves. The book is not a travelogue but has elements of one. He meets old friends and strangers, eats new foods, and ruefully observes changes in urban landscapes. His brief descriptions of Singapore, Taipei, Hong Kong and other cities on his route capture them in their essence.
"Bad Elements" is informative, horrifying, inspirational, and even funny at times. Anyone with an interest in Chinese culture, Asian politics, or modern history will find it enlightening.

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