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e-Book Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite download

e-Book Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite download

by Maya A. Beasley

ISBN: 0226040135
ISBN13: 978-0226040134
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (November 1, 2011)
Pages: 240
Category: Social Sciences
Subategory: Sociology

ePub size: 1680 kb
Fb2 size: 1128 kb
DJVU size: 1771 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 497
Other Formats: lit txt doc mobi

"Opting Out" takes on one of America's biggest failures, the disaffection from the American dream of a large portion of its best-educated Black young people. Beasley's analysis of the problem is compelling.

"Opting Out" takes on one of America's biggest failures, the disaffection from the American dream of a large portion of its best-educated Black young people. She goes well beyond trend analysis and examines the interior life of this population to understand why, with seemingly endless opportunity, talented and highly educated young black people are opting out of the mainstream of our economic life

Электронная книга "Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite", Maya A. Beasley. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS.

Электронная книга "Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite", Maya A. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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To explore these issues, Maya A. Beasley conducted . Ironically, Beasley also discovers, campus policies designed to enhance the academic and career potential of black students often reduce the diversity of their choices. Beasley conducted in-depth interviews with black and white juniors at two of the nation’s most elite universities, one public and one private. Beasley identifies a set of complex factors behind these students’ career aspirations, including the anticipation of discrimination in particular fields; the racial composition of classes, student groups, and teaching staff; student values; and the availability of opportunities to network

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A sophisticated study of racial disparity, Opting Out examines why some talented black undergraduates .

A sophisticated study of racial disparity, Opting Out examines why some talented black undergraduates pursue lower-paying, lower-status careers despite being amply qualified for more prosperous ones. To explore these issues, Maya A.

A sophisticated study of racial disparity, Opting Out examines why some talented black undergraduates pursue .

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Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite. Why has the large income gap between blacks and whites persisted for decades after the passage of civil rights legislation?

Opting Out: Losing the Potential of America's Young Black Elite. Why has the large income gap between blacks and whites persisted for decades after the passage of civil rights legislation? More specifically, why do African Americans remain substantiall. More). 1. View via Publisher.

Why has the large income gap between blacks and whites persisted for decades after the passage of civil rights legislation? More specifically, why do African Americans remain substantially underrepresented in the highest-paying professions, such as science, engineering, information technology, and finance? A sophisticated study of racial disparity, Opting Out examines why some talented black undergraduates pursue lower-paying, lower-status careers despite being amply qualified for more prosperous ones. To explore these issues, Maya A. Beasley conducted in-depth interviews with black and white juniors at two of the nation’s most elite universities, one public and one private. Beasley identifies a set of complex factors behind these students’ career aspirations, including the anticipation of discrimination in particular fields; the racial composition of classes, student groups, and teaching staff; student values; and the availability of opportunities to network. Ironically, Beasley also discovers, campus policies designed to enhance the academic and career potential of black students often reduce the diversity of their choices. Shedding new light on the root causes of racial inequality, Opting Out will be essential reading for parents, educators, students, scholars, and policymakers.
Comments:
Kelerana
Phenomenal. Well thought out. Provocative, though in a troubling way. The author is to be commended

Ceck
Beasley said Black college students don't hang with a range of other students. She also said their college majors are not as diverse as white counterparts. They want to go into jobs they deem "to help the Black community" and don't apply for other jobs that create or promote wealth. She compares Black students at Berkeley and Stanford regarding these concerns.

It was hard to digest this book because I exemplified the type of Black student she described. You can tell me that engineers and computer scientists make hand-over-foot money and that never made me think I could survive in those majors. If I could choose between an African-American Studies class and a physics class, I would never even touch the latter. I hate the stereotype that Blacks can't excel in science and math, but I do act as an example of it. When I was in college, it irritated me to no end that minority scholarship books would have info on about 1 million Black engineering scholarships, but not one for Black psych. majors, or Black lit. majors, or Black sociology majors.

Recently I read a book about upper-class Blacks. I forgot the name, but it should be easy for interested readers to find. The author stated of this group they hang with each other, not because of rejections by whites, but because they love and enjoy the company of other Blacks. It makes me proud that my community is "a community of caring." When I hear younger Blacks say they want to work at programs for inner-city youth, I applaud them. I don't tell them, "Skip all that and study nanotechnology!" This reminds me of how some say Blacks would be better off by voting for diverse candidates and thus should support Republicans more. However, other Blacks and myself make very strong, cogent arguements about why we are loyal to the Democratic Party. I highly doubt that an Asian-American researcher would argue their community needs more people to major in 18th-century poetry or something, as they face the opposite stereotypes of Blacks.

When I was in grad school at Berkeley, I met a Chicana who got into Stanford, but chose Berkeley. Personally, I think she made a mistake. Stanford has affirmative action and cares about diversity; Berkeley does not. Let's be real: it's FAAAAAAAR more difficult to get into Stanford than Berkeley for people of all races. But my unsolicited two cents is that if you, especially a Black person, gets into both schools, please go to the South Bay and not the East Bay, if you know what I mean.

Sometimes this book felt all over the place. Still, I would love it if this book can encourage Black students to major in STEM, but I couldn't have been that candidate back in my schooling years. The STEM majors I knew didn't care for reading long sociological studies, so I don't know if that group who can be influenced would spend the time on this text. This scholar is making a nice argument and I wish her well. However, I just can't see the trends she highlights as disappearing any time soon.

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