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e-Book The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture download

e-Book The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture download

by Daniel Harris

ISBN: 0786861657
ISBN13: 978-0786861651
Language: English
Publisher: Hyperion; 1st edition (May 1, 1997)
Pages: 288
Category: Social Sciences
Subategory: Sociology

ePub size: 1977 kb
Fb2 size: 1448 kb
DJVU size: 1494 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 893
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Daniel Harris comes on strong: "For far too long, the book trade has provided gay readers with nothing more than the .

Daniel Harris comes on strong: "For far too long, the book trade has provided gay readers with nothing more than the literary equivalent of a warm glow, a soothing linguistic salve for the walking wounded, as if we were all still 13 and were all still mustering the courage to come out, as if, after 25 years of gay liberation, we all still

Start by marking The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Can gay culture retain a separate and distinct identity as its major institutions lose their vitality and become both comfortable and familiar? Are homosexuals simply indulging in nostalgia when they attempt to resist assimilation an. .

Can gay culture retain a separate and distinct identity as its major institutions lose their vitality and become both comfortable and familiar? Are homosexuals simply indulging in nostalgia when they attempt to resist assimilation and protect their ethnic heritage from cooptation at the very moment when their identity is collapsing? . In "The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture," price-winning essayist and critic Daniel Harris traces the historical development and meaning of the artifacts and rituals of gay culture as they evolve over time. What is the source of the gay man's deification of such cult figures as Judy Garland and Joan Crawford?

Harris, Daniel, 1957-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger7 on September 26, 2011.

Harris, Daniel, 1957-. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The author analyzes contemporary gay culture-from male pin-ups to black leather fetishism to the AIDS memorial quilt-in an effort to trace the effects of increasing acceptance of.The rise and fall of gay culture.

The author analyzes contemporary gay culture-from male pin-ups to black leather fetishism to the AIDS memorial quilt-in an effort to trace the effects of increasing acceptance of homosexuality on gay sensibility. 1. Gay Men and Hollywood. 8. The Evolution of the Personals. 5 other sections not shown.

Harris often falls back on a primitive argument that blames advertisers for courting the gay market and thereby poisoning & gay minds with mainstream propaganda. Even plain white underwear is a culprit, says Harris: & homosexuals. want their briefs dehomosexualized. When Harris posits that the run-of-the-mill '90s drag queen dresses like Sissy Spacek at the climax of Carrie, one can only wonder what clubs he frequents.

By DANIEL HARRIS Hyperion. The Death of Camp: Gay Men and Hollywood Diva Worship, from Reverence to Ridicule.

Where appropriate, library historians should also chronicle the achievements of gay library worthies.

They are considered less conservative and more adventurous in their consumption habits ( Harris, 1997 ), more fashion forward ( Rudd, 1996 ), and more directly involved in their looks and appearance ( Sergios & Cody, 1985 ; Silberstein et al., 1989 .Where appropriate, library historians should also chronicle the achievements of gay library worthies.

The author analyzes contemporary gay culture--from male pin-ups to black leather fetishism to the AIDS memorial quilt--in an effort to trace the effects of increasing acceptance of homosexuality on gay sensibility.
Comments:
Phain
At first I thought this book was profoundly misanthropic, but halfway through I realized that the author was being arch and hilarious. He is a bit all over the place and I cannot quite pin down his thesis, if any - he finds something wrong with absolutely everything, so he is bound to hit a few true targets along the way. The way to enjoy this book is by throwing caution to the wind, indulge your inner misanthrope, and keep a sense of humor about it all.

It is interesting, though, that this book was written when gay culture was (in my experience) at an apex, but then I would say that, given that it was in the 90s that I was in the full glory of my youth. Still, since then we have lost so much - gay publishing is in its death throes, gay bookstores, gayborhoods, and gay social places have in many places been gentrified out of existence. More gay people than ever are living in economically precarious situations while gay lobbying organizations are increasingly focusing only on the concerns of the rich. And so on. I would really be curious to see the author revisit or rewrite the book now, in 2014 - I would definitely read such a book.

Usanner
So much junk is written and published for gays that intellectual piffle is very much the norm. One purpose that this norm does serve, as Harris bravely observes, is to reinforce a certain insipid status quo in which nonfiction for gay men serves as existential affirmation rather than food for thought. Harris is difficult, and with all respect, I think that his book's critics here aren't grasping his very subtle argument and argumentation. I don't think he's endorsing a reactionary return to diva worship or, for that matter, to the de-assimilation of gays from mainstream American culture. However, he rightly points out that the fashions, postures, traditions, modes of communication -- gay culture -- of the past arose out of necessity and was enhanced and enlivened by that necessity. I don't feel comfortable trying to recapitulate his argument, it's too complex and is resistant to simplistic paraphrasing. The best thing I can say about this book is that it elucidated for me the very origins of many of my own attitudes and aptitudes--it put my very own sensibilities as a gay man under a microscope and made me rethink why I am the way I am. And what I have to gain--and lose--by not being that way any more. If a book can tell me that both I and a culture in which I participate are a certain way for reasons of which I was previously unaware, that book is more than worth my time. It's worth rereading, which I plan to do this summer, a year after I first delved into this enlightening, genuinely intellectual, and iconoclastic book.

Hanelynai
Author Daniel Harris's book of critical essays is breath of fresh air for gay scholars in the field of gay studies. Harris looks critically at several different areas of gay culture: gay males and "diva" worship, gay romance in the personal ads, how gay men helped the underwear revolution, the AIDS "crisis", leathermen, gay pornography in both film and literature, gay magazines, drag and gay propaganda. Whiles Harris's book is now six years old, it is for me, relevant and fresh as he argues about the dangers in assimilation into heterosexual, mainstream culture. I wished he would have pointed out more clearly how gay men can stop and fight against assimilation through building our culture which I think for any scholar is a very blurry answer. Be prepared, this book generated quite a bit of debate in a book group that I belong to in Chicago and I feel that it gets similar reactions in any part of gay community when it is read. For me, though I wished more gay men would read such a fine work as this. If anything can be said for this work, it does generate thought and critical discussion which I think more and more people do not want to engage in, because it is so much easier not to. Plus society doesn't reinforce this; so much as it does the idea of the "status quo."

Kanrad
Take notes now: oppression is good, diversity bad, pretentiousness a virtue, modern gay relationships insipid, and images of happy, successful gay men and women are sure signs of "a demoralized age." Got it? Well, maybe not.
In this book, which explores the effects of the increased acceptance of homosexuality on gay lives and culture, Daniel Harris often comes across like my grandfather crankily chanting about the 14 hour work days and 12 mile homeward walks of his youth, back when folks really knew what life was about. Clinging desperately to an old, one-dimensional view of gay men based on the fact that they once pretty much universally shared tastes for Hollywood divas, ballet, and brawny heterosexual men, Harris is surprised and saddened to find that those similarities--all of which resulted more or less from pigeonholing by an intolerant society and some of which (even according to Harris himself) were little more than defense mechanisms against that hostility--are now fading away. He grudgingly admits the reason for this, which happens to be an overwhelmingly positive one--i.e. greater freedom, acceptance, and social contact for gay men than ever before. Once admitted, however, this fact is repeatedly lost in Harris' lengthy ode to the good old days.
A jacket blurb for this book calls Harris' insights "bravely critical". Well, certainly critical at any rate. Reading this book, the average homosexual will be enlightened to learn that not only is he boring, superficial, shallow, greedy, and conformist, but he is also incapable of romance--which is just as well, really, since he soon discovers that he doesn't know how to have sex correctly anyway. And even some of those "insights" seem . . . well, not terribly insightful. We learn that gay mens' worship of divas has nothing to do with the divas' femininity, an insight which is accompanied by references to Katherine Hepburn, Judy Garland, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, and characters like Holly Golightly and Auntie Mame, but, astonishingly, not a single reference to a male actor or character. Harris goes on to bemoan the increased diversity and economic power of gay culture, as a result of which it is now possible to market magazines to a specific portion of the population, including some directed at younger gay men which Harris accuses of "perpetrating pictorial genocide on men over the age of 40"--which is much like criticizing "Young Miss" for not featuring a lengthy interview with Eartha Kitt. He slashes magazines like "Out" for idealizing gay life and squelching the real stories of our gritty, dark, horrible lives; which, apart from being a questionable accusation, suggests that gay culture is far too advanced to harbor its own escapist equivalents of "Vanity Fair" or "People". Harris does, however, eventually let us into the secret that pretentiousness is one of the main defining characteristics of gay men, a statement which sheds a lot of light on Harris' viewpoints and on the rest of the book.
There's little question that the gay community could use the kind of shaking-up this book promised to give it. To be effective, however, a shake-up needs to jolt people into the future, not push them into the past. For now, we'll just have to take as a sign of progress the fact that the gay community is now diverse enough to have its own brand of fogies, led by Daniel Harris, tsk-tsk-ing and fearing that today's irresponsible young people are, as my grandfather would have put it, "going to hell in a handbasket".

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