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e-Book The Feynman Processor : Quantum Entanglement and the Computing Revolution (Helix Books Series) download

e-Book The Feynman Processor : Quantum Entanglement and the Computing Revolution (Helix Books Series) download

by Gerard J. Milburn

ISBN: 0738201731
ISBN13: 978-0738201733
Language: English
Publisher: Basic Books (December 1, 1999)
Pages: 240
Category: Hardware and DIY
Subategory: Technologies

ePub size: 1626 kb
Fb2 size: 1674 kb
DJVU size: 1142 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 400
Other Formats: lrf mobi lrf azw

But thanks to new discoveries by Gerard Milburn and other cutting-edge scientists, quantum computing is about to become a reality.

By reading "The Feynman Processor" don't hope to get deep insight into the field of quantum computation, but expect to get inspiration for studying the physics in more detail. The author has attempted to write a semi-popular text on quantum computation suitable for the reader with little knowledge of quantum physics. Therefore, throughout the text no mathematical formulae to speak of are displayed. Moreover, an introductory chapter has been included describing some of the characteristic features of quantum physics

In The Feynman Processor, quantum physicist Gerard J. Milburn describes the astounding .

In The Feynman Processor, quantum physicist Gerard J. Milburn describes the astounding principles of the quantum world that are about to revolutionize the world of computers - including a concept created by the legendary American physicist Richard Feynman, which proves that the most important principle in a quantum computer is that of probability amplitude, a rule that has become known as "Feynman's Rule.

This book is about quantum computing and quantum algorithms. The book starts with a chapter introducing the basic rules of quantum mechanics and how they can be used to build quantum circuits and perform computations.

The Feynman Processor book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Feynman Processor: Quantum Entanglement And The Computing Revolution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Feynman Processor : Quantum Entanglement and the Computing Revolution. by Gerard J. Milburn. But thanks to new discoveries by Gerard Milburn and other cutting-edge scientists, quantum computing is about to become a reality.

Gerard J. Milburn The Feynman Processor: Quantum Entanglement and the Computing Revolution

Gerard J. Milburn The Feynman Processor: Quantum Entanglement and the Computing Revolution. If computational systems are a natural consequence of physical law, then a quantum computer is not only possible, but inevitable. It may take decades, perhaps a century, but a commercially viable quantum computer is a certainty. The book combines an introduction to quantum mechanics with an introduction to computer science and then ties the two together with an explanation of the possibilities of quantum computing. This isn't the best place to get a 'real' introduction to either quantum physics or computer science though.

Gerard James Milburn (born 1958) is an Australian theoretical quantum physicist notable for his work on quantum feedback control, quantum measurements, quantum information, open quantum systems, and Linear optical quantum computing (aka the Knill, L. .

Gerard James Milburn (born 1958) is an Australian theoretical quantum physicist notable for his work on quantum feedback control, quantum measurements, quantum information, open quantum systems, and Linear optical quantum computing (aka the Knill, Laflamme and Milburn scheme). Milburn received his BSc (Hons) in Physics from Griffith University in 1980.

The Feynman processor. quantum entanglement and the computing revolution. Originally published: St Leonards, . Allen & Unwin, 1998. Frontiers of science, Helix books, Frontiers of science (Reading, Mass. Published 1998 by Perseus Books in Reading, Mass.

Quantum computing, the reduction of computing elements to sizes far smaller than that of present-day chips, down to the size of individual atoms, presents new problems, problems on the quantum level. But thanks to new discoveries by Gerard Milburn and other cutting-edge scientists, quantum computing is about to become a reality.In this book, the first one for the general public to explain the scientific ideas behind concepts seen before only in science fiction, physicist Milburn brings us the exciting world of phenomena of entanglement, where particles can be in two places at the same time, where matter on the quantum level can be teleported à la Star Trek's famous Transporter; and where cryptographers can construct fundamentally unbreakable computer codes.Although other books and magazine articles have dealt with some of the subjects in this book, this is the first book for the layman to deal specifically with quantum computing, an area pioneered by the great physicist Richard Feynman, who first posed the challenge to scientists to devise the smallest, fastest computer elements, to take us to the absolute physical limits of computers. This book promises to both astound and educate every reader eager to keep abreast of the latest breakthroughs in physics and computers.
Comments:
INwhite
Mathematics was invented for a reason, and the avoidance of even simple mathematics makes this book near unintelligible. Further, the habit of versing quantum theory in terms of genetics, real and imagined, further separates the subject mater from the reader; and giving Feynman credit for how probability amplitudes add would probably not please him at all. Give this one a wide berth and read instead 'The quest for the quantum computer' by Julian Brown which is everything this book is not.

Nto
Timely reading with ongoing US and Swiss quantum computing research currently newsworthy due to NSA wanting fast processors to break codes in the war on terrorism.

Zugar
Reading unfinished, this is a document of thought-bending topics: Probability and Physical models converge.
Heady topics often requiring contemplation or research, prior to moving forward.

krot
This book is clearly written by a physics professor who doesn't spend much time talking to people who haven't studied physics. I would guess his editor falls into this category as well. The back cover praises its accessibility, a marketing gimmick as obviously deceptive as the sensationalistic chapter names. For example, one chapter, "Teleportation for Gamblers" is named after an obscure quantum phenomenon that has been dubbed teleportation for no apparent reason, has nothing to do with gambling, and is only referred to in passing.
The first four chapters try to give an overview of quantum mechanics to those who haven't studied physics. Even after spending 4 years earning a Bachelor's in Physics, I was only barely able to follow the discussion. If I did not already understand the principles he was explaining, I would never have been able to fill in the holes of explanation.
But my biggest complaint about this section is that he bases the entire discussion on calculating probabilities in a quantum environment. But in trying to avoid complex math, he leaves out essential details. The much more intuitive explanation of superposition of states (whereby an object is in two places or states at the same time) he barely mentions in this section. If the material was presented in this way, all the math would be unnecessary, and the interesting second part of the book would make much more sense.
Beyond that, the book contains numerous factual mistakes. His Turing machine for multiplying on page 99 just doesn't work. On page 109, he says that if you have N objects, and for each object you need to store N pieces of information that have a total of N^N pieces of information. The correct answer, N^2, makes his point much less dramatic.
The last two chapters are interesting indeed. They discuss what is possible with a quantum computer, and the state of research in 1998. I recommend that if you do buy this book, only read the last two chapters. If you can't follow it, look anywhere else for an explanation. The first four chapters will not help.

Jorad
By reading "The Feynman Processor" don't hope to get deep insight into the field of quantum computation, but expect to get inspiration for studying the physics in more detail.
The author has attempted to write a semi-popular text on quantum computation suitable for the reader with little knowledge of quantum physics. Therefore, throughout the text no mathematical formulae to speak of are displayed. Moreover, an introductory chapter has been included describing some of the characteristic features of quantum physics.
Before discussing quantum computation the reader is confronted with related topics such as 'quantum entanglement' and even 'quantum teleportation'. Unfortunately, long arguments and reasoning are sometimes placed in the middle of a section without warning. This makes some sections of the book frustratingly hard to read -- for the beginner as well as for the more experienced physicist. But if the reader makes it through the first half of the book, the second half dealing with quantum computation itself will be more pleasing to read.
Disappointingly, not many references are listed. Also, the figures included remind somewhat of hasty job. Even though much can be said about "The Feynman Processor", the information provided by Prof. Milburn is reliable and up to date (1998).

Cheber
This book is intended for a non-scientific person. Unfortunately, the short references and unclear points made in the book could only add to the reader's confusion. For instance, sometimes the author has tried to simplify the subject with more than obvious explanations, and then at other places he explain things with an elaborate scheme of "AND " and "NOT" gates! The content of most chapters are composed of incongruent subjects glued together. The basic principle of quantum physics, the Heisenberg Uncertainly and Max Born probability, is presented in an example which is referred to repeatedly across the book for non-technical people. The main idea of the book is forgotten during explanation of long sections which follows no style. Unfortunately, the book can not be used by people familiar with the quantum theory either because of non-mathematical representation of the subject. In general, it would be hard for any reader to follow the course of the concepts presented in this book. This book convinced me more than ever that writing scientific subjects for the public is by itself a science!

Reddefender
This book does not take you through quantum computing in any logical way. The author does not explain where he is going with his lengthy examples in each section. Instead he tends to launch into hard to follow, artificially concocted examples with little rationale and then move to the next topic without a conclusion or a reason for why he put the reader through such boring experience. The discussion of the Bohr - Einstein debate told me nothing of what the debate was about and there are many references to the EPR without any real explanation of what was in it. There must be a better way to understand this subject else I will have to conclude that Einstein was right and God really does play dice. Give this book a miss... it is simply not worth the effort. Even my one star is generous.

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