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e-Book Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet download

e-Book Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet download

by Jean Guisnel

ISBN: 0738202606
ISBN13: 978-0738202600
Language: English
Publisher: Basic Books (December 15, 1999)
Pages: 296
Category: Networking and Cloud Computing
Subategory: Technologies

ePub size: 1749 kb
Fb2 size: 1532 kb
DJVU size: 1678 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 384
Other Formats: mobi lit docx azw

Jean Guisnel is the author of several books in French on the intelligence community. First written in the late 1990s, the author describes a war of espionage being waged on the internet between nation-states.

Jean Guisnel is the author of several books in French on the intelligence community. A well-known French journalist, he has been defense-issues specialist for the French daily Liberation and is currently a reporter for the major news magazine Le Point. What he only began to detect then has certainly come to pass. Today, our national government though Cyber Command and other initiatives is truly focused on this challenge.

Jean Guisnel, a journalist specializing in defense issues, takes a hard look at the controversies surrounding Internet security, striking a balance between th. .To some a brand-new forum for the freedom of speech, the Internet is also the most up-to-date way to gather intelligence. Brilliant hackers like Kevin Mitnik-modern-day "pirates"-pose real security threats to government and industry.

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet. An excellent book for such things as the influence of the internet in areas of cryptography or for the general history of the internet

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet. 0738202606 (ISBN13: 9780738202600). An excellent book for such things as the influence of the internet in areas of cryptography or for the general history of the internet. However, I did find that the name was a bit of a misnomer; when I first picked up this book and read the description I presumed it would focus on cyberwarfare between state agents.

Computer crimes, Computer security, Information superhighway - Security measures, Internet - Security measures, World Wide Web - Security measures, Secret service, Intelligence service, Business intelligence. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 12, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

ISBN: 0738202606; Издательство: Perseus Books Group

ISBN: 0738202606; Издательство: Perseus Books Group. Brilliant hackers like Kevin Mitnik-modern-day "pirates"-pose real security threats to government and industry

Cyberwars : Espionage on the Internet. Examining efforts to police on-line communication and content, Guisnel assesses the implications of pervasive surveillance for the inherently democratic medium of the Internet

Cyberwars : Espionage on the Internet. By (author) Jean Guisnel. Examining efforts to police on-line communication and content, Guisnel assesses the implications of pervasive surveillance for the inherently democratic medium of the Internet. As these issues are the focus of ongoing debates in government and the private sector, Cyberwars couldn’t be more timely. Format Hardback 295 pages. Dimensions 14. 2 x 21. 2 x 3. 8mm 47. 7g. Publication date 01 Oct 1997. Publisher BASIC BOOKS. Publication City/Country United States.

But in Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet (translated by Gui Masai . What’s refreshing about Guisnel’s book is its French perspective. This all makes for an informative and entertaining book. If automation can’t be relied on to control the Net, what can? International laws perhaps?

You would never guess that the book’s main focus is whether the Internet will strengthen freedom, democracy and privacy, or weaken them. If automation can’t be relied on to control the Net, what can? International laws perhaps?

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet, by Jean Guisnel; Gui Masai; Winn Schwartau, ISBN: 0738202606 . Top Ten Hacker Books This is a list of recommended (non-fiction) books about hackers and hacking which involve real life descriptions of events, and the personalities involved.

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet, by Jean Guisnel; Gui Masai; Winn Schwartau, ISBN: 0738202606, Feb 2000. Digital Evidence and Computer Crime: Forensic Science, Computers, and the Internet (with CDROM ), by Eoghan Casey, ISBN: 012162885X, Jan 2000.

Cyberwars : (Guisnel Jean)

Cyberwars : (Guisnel Jean). Bibliographical information (record 184508). Some Background on the Internet - 1. The New Secret Services - 2. The First Cyberwarriors - 3. Cryptology, Island of Liberty - 4. The Jolly Roger Rides the Net - 5. Privateers and Buccaneers - 6. The Golden Age of Cybercops - 7. Information Wars - 8. The Internet and Espionomics - 9. Economics, the New Battlefield - 10. High Stakes at High Noon.

verte/Poche, pp. 117-127; Jean Guisnél (1999), Cyberwars: Espionage. on the Internet, New York: Basic Books and David S. Wall (2007), Cy-. bercrime: The Transformation of Crime in the Information Age, Cam

verte/Poche, pp. bercrime: The Transformation of Crime in the Information Age, Cam-. bridge: Polity Press. 10 Lakomy (2010), p. 55-58. 11 Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake (2010), Cyber War, New. York: Ecco, pp. 36. 12 Bradley Graham (2005), ‘Hackers Attack via Chinese Web Sites

To some a brand-new forum for the freedom of speech, the Internet is also the most up-to-date way to gather intelligence. Brilliant hackers like Kevin Mitnik—modern-day “pirates”—pose real security threats to government and industry. Cyberwars explores a dangerous new world where international terrorists plot their attacks and are tracked by secret service organizations on-line, drug traffickers do business and launder money, and electronic economic espionage is the order of the day. Examining efforts to police on-line communication and content, Guisnel assesses the implications of pervasive surveillance for the inherently democratic medium of the Internet. As these issues are the focus of ongoing debates in government and the private sector, Cyberwars couldn't be more timely.
Comments:
Snowskin
CyberWars identifies the key issues in today’s cyber world with remarkable prescience. In some ways it reminds us of just how fast so much has changed with the explosive growth of the internet. But some of the key cyber issues of today were chillingly foretold by Jean Guisnel in CyberWars.

This book was originally published as Guerres dans le cyberspace in a French language edition in 1995. It was first translated into an English edition in 1997 and was again reissued by Basic Books in December 1999. It is currently in print and is available online at Amazon. I was living in Paris when it first appeared and I read the original in French. I have just recently reread the English language edition, CyberWars.

This may be the first book about cyber ever written. Surprisingly many of the same points that were made then are the same ones that concern us today. The author’s original observations, thoughts, and conclusions are still valid.

First written in the late 1990s, the author describes a war of espionage being waged on the internet between nation-states. What he only began to detect then has certainly come to pass. Today, our national government though Cyber Command and other initiatives is truly focused on this challenge. But then as now, cyber criminality and the corresponding role for law enforcement is often lost in the clamor over cyber war and espionage. This is manifest even in Cyberwars, where many of the Guisnel’s examples involve actually criminal activity.

The book addresses one case in which I was intimately involved, although I am mischaracterized as “the FBI’s Parisian counterespionage chief”. A career FBI agent, I was then assigned as the Legal Attaché at the US Embassy. In close collaboration with the French Gendarmerie, we managed to obtain the conviction of a hacker, resulting in a jail sentence and heavy fines. As is often the case today, the hacker and his confederates were portrayed in the media as pranksters, not real criminals. Even Guisnel, in CyberWars, diminishes their danger by characterizing them simply as “rascals”.

In fact, that hacker case brought us face-to-face with what we now know as the “Dark Web”. That hacker was part of a worldwide criminal network that used online Bulletin Boards – accessible only to their co-conspirators - to exchange prohibited information and leave messages for other hackers.

CyberWars treats the battle waged in the late 90s by then FBI Director Louie Freeh and others to find a legal way to ‘work-around’ the roadblock of unbreakable encryption. The issues discussed in CyberWars are the so-called ‘clipper-chip’ and later ‘key management’. The key being a way for law enforcement to legally bypass encrypted communications. The issue – then and now – the balance between security and privacy. On separate occasions, I accompanied Attorney General Janet Reno and FBI Director Louie Freeh to meetings with their French Counter parts on this issue, in an effort to form similar approaches. The issue is still unresolved. Just a year ago the same debate surfaced when FBI Director James Comey asked Apple for help in unlocking a cell phone in the course of the investigation of the terrorist attack in San Bernardino. Apple refused.

Much in CyberWars puts current issues in perspective, it is a valuable read.

The only distraction is the often imprecise translations from French to English. This is particularly annoying when it involves the usage of intelligence or law enforcement terms and titles. The Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) an offensive service, is misidentified as ASIO, which is the acronym for that county’s defensive service. The Canadian Service is identified by its French language initials (SCSR) which is rarely used, even in Quebec. The Canadian service is usually referred to by the acronym CSIS, which stands for Canadian Security Intelligence Service. In CyberWars, however, the full name is set forth as Canadian Security Information Service. The French word renseignement could be translated as either information or intelligence. Repeatedly the phase “intelligence” service is mistranslated as “information” service. The US Spy agencies (NSA and CIA) are rendered as “secret services”, a terminology that is just not used for them in American English. These somewhat understandable mistranslations are undoubtedly the work of a professional translator. These errors could have been avoided by having the translated text reviewed by someone with bilingual knowledge of intelligence matters.

Were it not for these annoying mistranslations, I would certainly award this insightful book with five stars.

Wild Python
This book is a lightweight in the recent flood of cyberscare publications. It presents some interesting perspectives on US-French competition in the world of industrial espionage but overall it is not very informative. Its principal failing is that it is a book about technology that butchers technical details.
The author's disconnect with technology is demonstrated in his discussion of the Clipper chip. Clipper is now installed in most stand-alone voice encryptors that are sold in the US. At the beginning of each phone call a new session key is shared between the two callers. It is not practical to find this session key by guessing but a separately encrypted version is sent along with the conversation. The session key can be discovered by government agencies through appropriate procedures. The author's discussion of this states that a NSA proposal "...would add a device called the clipper chip to every telephone or computer manufactured in the United States." For most phones that use analog transmission of voice this would clearly make no sense. Apparently the author missed the issue entirely.
In places the book becomes more of a political platform than a balanced discussion. After condemning filtering programs that block access to porn sites he states that "The fun for those who devote themselves to censorship is the daily discovery of new sites that they can condemn and prohibit"
Even commonly known security details are missed. In a discussion of phone phreaking the author states that the publication titled 2600 was named after the frequency that a quarter made when falling into a pay phone. 2600 Hertz is actually the frequency of a supervisory tone that was used to bypass toll equipment.
In an evaluation of the hacker Kevin Mitnick's his technical abilities were rated as #2 in the world. I am personally aquatinted with associates of Mitnick who state that he is a technical wannabe that excels only in dumpster diving and social engineering.
[exerpted from a review for Security Management -- all rights reserved by the author]

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