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e-Book Fast Track UML 2.0 download

e-Book Fast Track UML 2.0 download

by Apress,Kendall Scott

ISBN: 1590593200
ISBN13: 978-1590593202
Language: English
Publisher: Apress; Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. edition (March 19, 2004)
Pages: 350
Category: Programming
Subategory: Technologies

ePub size: 1177 kb
Fb2 size: 1676 kb
DJVU size: 1800 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 164
Other Formats: mbr lrf doc lit

Kendall Scott is known in the IT community as the author, coauthor, and supporting author of five UML books . This is a 160-page plus "Fast Track" book supposed to let the reader get acquainted with UML . quicker than going through the Superstructure Specification.

Kendall Scott is known in the IT community as the author, coauthor, and supporting author of five UML books, including UML Explained and the acclaimed UML Distilled. He partially makes his living as a UML trainer and mentor of technical and nontechnical students in a variety of industries. His previous experience includes 16 years as a technical writer, with a historical emphasis on turning complicated (and often voluminous) material into easy-to-use manuals and assorted documents for a wide range of readers.

Authors: Scott, Kendall. This is a book that focuses pretty much on the core elements of UML . if you are looking for a fast introduction to the different UML . constructs then this is a good place to start. eBook 18,18 €. price for Russian Federation (gross). The book makes good use of diagram. .pictures are supplemented with concise text detailing what the diagram is modelling and how it is used. This kind of material adds valu.This really is a fast track to UML .

Kendall Scott is known in the IT community as the author, coauthor, and supporting author of five UML books, including UML Explained and the acclaimed UML Distilled

Kendall Scott is known in the IT community as the author, coauthor, and supporting author of five UML books, including UML Explained and the acclaimed UML Distilled. Scott is a ACM/IEEE member.

Kendall Scott, Apress others, Fast Track UML . explores the modeling techniques and the changes . the prior UML . standard

Kendall Scott, Apress. Through the use of standard diagrams for such concepts as use cases, interactions, and collaborations, among many others, Fast Track UML . explores the modeling techniques and the changes since the prior UML . standard. This book presents a distillation of the contents of the UML Superstructure document.

This repository accompanies Fast Track UML . by Kendall Scott (Apress, 2004). Release v. corresponds to the code in the published book, without corrections or updates. Download the files as a zip using the green button, or clone the repository to your machine using Git. Releases. See the file Contributing. md for more information on how you can contribute to this repository.

Fast Track UML . book. Examples are easy to understand; diagrams aren't overly busy. Condensed, distilled presentation of the UML Superstructure document will get you up to speed with UML .

Kendall Scott is known in the IT community as the author, coauthor, and supporting author of five UML books, including UML . Scott is a ACM/IEEE member

Kendall Scott is known in the IT community as the author, coauthor, and supporting author of five UML books, including UML Explained and the acclaimed UML Distilled.

oceedings{Scott2004FastTU, title {Fast Track UML . }, author {Kendall Scott}, booktitle {Apress}, year {2004} }. Kendall Scott.

Through the use of standard diagrams for such concepts as use cases, interactions, and collaborations, among many others, Fast Track UML . explores the modeling techniques and the changes since the UML . Kendall Scott presents a new look at the contents of the UML Superstructure document without overloading you with details. oceedings{Scott2004FastTU, title {Fast Track UML .

That said, if you're drawing fancy pictures using syntax not described in Fast Track UML ., then perhaps that's a sign that you're models are too detailed.

In the book, the author does not attempt to describe the differences between UML . and UML ., or to point out the new features. That said, if you're drawing fancy pictures using syntax not described in Fast Track UML .

* Examples are easy to understand; diagrams aren’t overly busy.

* Written in user-friendly style author is known for.

* Condensed, distilled presentation of the UML Superstructure document will get you up to speed with UML 2.0.

Comments:
Original
I found this book overall unclear and misleading. I won't comment on the typing errors, as a few have already been pointed out by the other reviewers.

Below, a few samples of what I mean:

1) Page 9, on attribute property: "... readOnly, which indicates that you can add possible values for the attribute, but you can't change existing values". I am not sure I understand this and I am not sure it's correct. Correct definition, according to the UML Reference Manual Second Edition, page 555, is "A keyword of changeability indicating a property whose value may not be modified after initialization". Period.

2) Page 10, on parameter direction: "out (The operation sets or changes the value of the parameter and returns it to the caller.)". Then, "inout (The operation uses the value of the parameter and may change the value; the caller expects to see an inout parameter again.)". If in both cases the operation changes and returns the parameter to the caller, then what's the difference between the two types of parameters? Here are the definitions provided by the UML Reference Manual, respectively at pages 503 and 397: "Out parameter: A parameter that communicates values to the caller using side effects on the parameter calling mechanism". Then, on "Inout parameter: A parameter used to supply arguments to the called procedure and also return values to the caller using side effects on the parameter itself". The latter set of definitions is crystal clear to me, whereas the former is not.

3) Page 10, on default value of a parameter: "A default value of a parameter for an operation means that each call to that operation includes that value for the given parameter." I don't think so. Again, UML Reference Manual, page 307, gives the proper definition: "A value supplied automatically for a parameter if no argument value is provided".

4) Pages 29-30, Fig. 2-10, Aggregations: Here we have an aggregation example where "... an instance of the Order class that aggregates one each of instances of the ShippingInfo and BillingInfo classes and one or more instances of the Book class. An important property of aggregation is that the aggregated classes are still basically independent of the aggregating class. In other words, when a particular Order goes away (because it's been archived, for example), the ShippingInfo and BillingInfo instances that were aggregated to that Order are still present in the system. (The Book instance, of course, is gone.)". Why is the Book instance "of course" gone? Taking into account that the Book class is shown having the attribute Title only, is this some weird bookstore that sells each book of a kind only once? Or, more possibly, is that another Book class attribute that is not shown and that truly makes a particular book unique in bookstore's inventory, such an inventory number? It's guesswork for the reader that ought not to be.

5) Page 102, on Submachines: "... A submachine state is a state that references a submachine such that a copy of that submachine is implicitly part of the enclosing state machine where the reference occurs". This one seems to be an extract from the UML Reference Manual, page 627, but without the two full pages that follow and that provide clarification and an example to the somewhat obscure definition above.

6) Page 128, on Node: "A node represents a computational resource that generally has memory and often has processing capability." The terms "generally" and "often" implying that they may not, is a computational resource that has no memory and no processing capability still one? Well, apparently yes, because "... Nodes include computing devices but also human resources or mechanical processing resources", as mentioned at page 479 of the UML Reference Manual, but nowhere in this book.

7) Page 129, on Execution environment: "An execution environment offers an environment for the execution of specific types of components that are deployed on the environment, in the form of executable artifacts". I found a more comprehensible definition at page 343 of the UML Reference Manual.

This is a 160-page plus "Fast Track" book supposed to let the reader get acquainted with UML 2.0 quicker than going through the Superstructure Specification. Instead, I spent as much time as if it were a 1000-page book, doing guesswork all the way long on what the author meant to say and kept doing continuous cross-checks with the UML User's Guide and the UML Reference Manual.

Therefore, my unique recommendation to the potential reader: If you need an UML book, better get another one.

Kale
I bought this book for its value as a "quick read" of UML 2.0, and as prep for the OMG UML Certification.

I'm just on Chapter 1, and have found so many glaring errors so far that I suspect everything in the book has to be carefully read and re-read to identify the errors.

Examples: page 12 - the definitions for "precondition: and "postcondition" are EXACTLY the same. Page 17 - the graphic does not support the text that the notation for aggregation and composition are different. I suspect that the book was rushed to publication without adequate proofreading, which is too bad because, other than the errors, it's very consice and read-able.

Blacknight
As described on the back cover of the book, the target audience of Fast Track UML 2.0 includes folks with previous visual modeling knowledge, perhaps including UML 1.x experience. In the book, the author does not attempt to describe the differences between UML 2.0 and UML 1.x, or to point out the new features. Instead, in a content-packed 161 pages, Kendall, with a "fresh look" at UML 2.0, describes well what a typical developer would want to know about modeling with this improved language.
Normally, when a book's title tries to convey that it's going to teach me something "really fast" or "in just XX hours", I won't even pick it up. In this case, from reading a few of his previous books, I trusted that the author, Kendall Scott, had probably put together another good book worth reading, and he did.
I'm a mildly experienced developer with a bit of object-oriented analysis and design (OOAD) understanding. In this book, I was looking for something that would quickly bring me up to date with UML 2.0, while still serving as a good reference manual into the future, as I sit down for some fancy picture drawing, also known as visual modeling. This is that book.
I would definitely recommend this book to anyone looking for a well-written, easy to follow and understand, concise UML 2.0 reference manual. If you're a career designer, note that this book does not describe in full detail, the complete syntax of UML 2.0. That said, if you're drawing fancy pictures using syntax not described in Fast Track UML 2.0, then perhaps that's a sign that you're models are too detailed. If you're brand new to the study of OOAD looking to develop these skills, this book alone probably isn't what you're after, though it would still serve well as a supplement to another material geared towards teaching OOAD. As a bonus, the book is priced well.

Ndlaitha
M. J. Graham correctly points out that the definition of postcondition is incorrect. This has been addressed. She also correctly notes that something is wrong with Figure 1-17; there was a problem in showing the box around PostingRule as a dashed outline, and I'm not sure why this was not corrected. However, I fail to see how these add up to 'so many glaring errors,' and I suggest that Ms. Graham forward notice of other errors she finds to APress for future correction.

Mr. Ng, on the other hand, makes an assertion that is clearly false. The differences between the notations in Figure 1-13 are explained on the previous page; if he wishes to see an expression of which notation is 'better,' he'll have to find a different book. In the meantime, remarks such as 'sometimes you read it with lots of ambiguities come into your mind' is less than useful. With regard to the comment about how 'bad' it was written, I'll just say that at least I know proper grammar.

DEAD-SHOT
In response to the comment "Too Many Errors to be Useful" dated August 19, 2004, I would like to further commenting how bad it was written. Not only it is too consise, sometimes you read it with lots of ambiguities come into your mind.

Same as M. J. Graham, I stopped proceeding beyond half of the Chapter 1. Figure 1.13 shows two examples of provided interfaces, using both notations. The usage differences between the two notations are never addressed.

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