pbstudio
e-Book Dying To Sin download

e-Book Dying To Sin download

by Stephen Booth

ISBN: 0007243448
ISBN13: 978-0007243440
Language: English
Publisher: Harper (2008)
Pages: 560
Category: Mystery
Subategory: Thriller

ePub size: 1933 kb
Fb2 size: 1266 kb
DJVU size: 1511 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 164
Other Formats: lrf mobi rtf doc

Stephen Booth's deep sense of place (England's Peak District) and his complex, sympathetic portraits of the . they're all sort of "a day in the life of" some engaging detectives in compelling circumstances.

Stephen Booth's deep sense of place (England's Peak District) and his complex, sympathetic portraits of the people who inhabit it set these absorbing police procedurals well apart from the rest of the genre. There is such vivid sensory description and intensity of emotion that I feel I have LIVED these books along with all the memorable, well-rounded characters Booth has created, most especially Cooper and Fry themselves as they develop and change over time. The "crimes" are not run-of-the-mill.

STEPHEN BOOTH Dying to Sin Dedicated to the officers and staff of Derbyshire Constabulary B Division, with particular thanks to Divisional Commander, Chief Superintendent Roger. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38. STEPHEN BOOTH. Dying to Sin. Dedicated to the officers and staff of Derbyshire. Constabulary B Division, with particular thanks.

He saw few cars on the road and passed even fewer houses – just the occasional farm wrapped in its own little bowl of light. According to the weather forecast on the BBC, there was no chance of snow. It would be a traditional grey Christmas. Fog was the best that Edendale could hope for in the way of seasonal weather. There’d be a blanket of it filling the valley, smothering the sound of Christmas Day traffic, hiding the flickering lights of the council decorations. And killing a few more visitors on the roads, no doubt. The old people sometimes described the Peak.

Stephen Booth was born in the Lancashire mill town of Burnley and has remained rooted to the Pennines during his career as a newspaper journalist

Stephen Booth was born in the Lancashire mill town of Burnley and has remained rooted to the Pennines during his career as a newspaper journalist. He lives with his wife Lesley in a former Georgian dower house in Nottinghamshire and his interests include folklore, the Internet and walking in the hills of the Peak District.

Report an error in the book. You never know what you might uncover.

Dying to Sin bcadf-8. Some sins won't wash away. A summer of endless rain in the Peak District leaves the officers of Derbyshire's criminal investigation department with a problem. They have discovered a man's body lying in shallow water, but torrential downpours have swollen the rivers and flooded the roads, making travel difficult and forensic examination impossible

Dying to Sin. Try Storytel. 8 50 5 Author: Stephen Booth Narrator: Russell Boulter.

Dying to Sin. The atmospheric and terrifying new Peak District thriller, featuring Detectives Fry and Cooper from the award-winning Stephen Booth. For decades, Pity Wood Farm has been a source of employment for poor workers passing through Rakedale, migrants with lives as abject as the labour they sought.

The atmospheric and terrifying new Peak District thriller, featuring Detectives Fry and Cooper from the award-winning Stephen Booth. For decades, Pity Wood Farm has been a source of employment for poor workers passing through Rakedale, migrants with lives as abject as the labour they sought. But now it seems a far worse fate may have befallen some of those who came upon this isolated community. Routine building work at the farm has unearthed a grisly discovery: a human hand preserved in clay. When police dig up the farmyard, they find not one, but two bodies -- and several years between their burials. With pressure from a new Superintendent and scant forensic evidence to aid them, DS Diane Fry and DC Ben Cooper have only the memories of local people to piece together the history of the farm. In a case as cold as the ground, Cooper finds himself drawn to a desperate theory: that somewhere, there lies a third body which holds the key to these dreadful crimes.
Comments:
Levion
I am delighted to see that all of the Cooper and Fry books (15 to date) are now available on Kindle. I read a few of them back at the turn of the decade, and then there were none, and I had no idea if there would be any more. But here they all are, thankfully.

"Dying to Sin" concerns headless bodies, skulls kept for good luck, migrant workers, a decrepit farm, grotesque villagers, and--of course--DC (detective constable) Ben Cooper and DS (sergeant) Diane Fry. The ill-matched pair conduct the investigation, while the entire squad awaits the arrival of a new Superintendant.

It's quite dark, but fortunately most of the violence occurs in the background. There is, as always with Stephen Booth, a great sense of place--England's Peak District, located near Sheffield and Nottingham. (There's a national park there.)

The "fun" (if that's the right word for it) comes from watching Fry and Cooper play off each other. Cooper, who was born on a farm, has far more success in talking to the natives, something which frustrates Fry, who at one point is assigned to a secondary job in the investigation, but manages to barge her way back in.

You need not have read any of the other books in the series to enjoy this one. Try it.

Notes and asides: Mild violence, drugs, English terminology. SOCO=CSI. SatNav=GPS. You know what a lorry is, right?

Balladolbine
Stephen Booth's deep sense of place (England's Peak District) and his complex, sympathetic portraits of the people who inhabit it set these absorbing police procedurals well apart from the rest of the genre.

There is such vivid sensory description and intensity of emotion that I feel I have LIVED these books along with all the memorable, well-rounded characters Booth has created, most especially Cooper and Fry themselves as they develop and change over time. Even minor characters are never allowed to become stereotypes.

We come to know and care about these characters, and they gain our deepest sympathy regardless of their flaws. Each new book shows us more, and just as in real life, their actions and thoughts are beyond our ability to predict as we move through time with them.

The Peak District itself could be said to be a character here as well, and Booth continually updates and develops the series' sense of place. We see and feel these changes along with the characters, and the same sense of nostalgia and loss that affects them spreads to us and becomes ever more deeply felt.

Above all, Booth respects his reader, takes no shortcuts, springs no rude surprises. Everything works together to build a complex and believable world that we can only hope will be sustained on and on into the future. This writer deserves a much greater audience in the U.S.

Manesenci
It went on one chapter too long. The final line of the penultimate chapter would have been the perfect ending too the story. The last chapter – gloomy and depressing – added nothing but word count to the story.

Booth still spends too much time detailing the main characters’ introspections. In the middle of a scene, the POV character will suddenly veer off into mental rambling about something only peripherally related to events. This kills the story’s forward momentum until Booth returns to the plot. Although this book is over 100 pages shorter (at roughly 500 pages) than prior entries, these asides still need more paring down.

Booth continues to soften Fry’s attitude toward Cooper, which is a welcome change from earlier books where she seemed to treat him as a slightly addled stepbrother – tolerated but not accepted because he will never quite be her equal. I’m beginning to wonder why he doesn’t tell her off once and for all.

Maybe it does really rain a lot in the Peak District, but Booth often has his characters standing out in it, getting soaked. In the real world, they would know enough to dress in proper rain gear. Come on, Mr. Booth, fix that.

Despite these niggling irritations I keep reading these books because stripped of all the wasted words, Booth tells a great story about an engaging mystery.

Mautaxe
If you like blood and gore and nightmare worthy suspense, don't bother reading this book.

I love all of Stephen Booth's novels...they're subtle and ... well ... interesting! I've learned a lot about the Peak District in England and I so want to go there someday, see it all, learn more...and all because of these books.

The plot is intriguing, but not what might be called "intrigue." There's a lot of plodding detective work. Then suddenly you're at the end and realize that everything has actually taken place in a matter of a few days.

The characters are well defined, and quite personable, though in different respects. I especially like Ben Cooper, who I always imagine as Daniel Casey of Midsomer Murders fame. =)

Dying to Sin is another insightful, thought provoking Booth creation...they're all sort of "a day in the life of" some engaging detectives in compelling circumstances. The "crimes" are not run-of-the-mill. I really enjoy Ben Cooper's perspicacity. I would LOVE to see Booth's novels made into a PBS/BBC Mystery series of the quality of Broadchurch.

ISBN: 0751523208
ISBN13: 978-0751523201
language: English
Subcategory: Mystery
e-Book Cold Comfort Farm download

Cold Comfort Farm epub fb2

by Eileen Atkins,Stella Gibbons
ISBN: 0140865756
ISBN13: 978-0140865752
language: English
e-Book White Peak Farm download

White Peak Farm epub fb2

by Berlie Doherty
ISBN: 0531084671
ISBN13: 978-0531084670
language: English
ISBN: 0333749502
ISBN13: 978-0333749500
language: English
e-Book The Body Farm download

The Body Farm epub fb2

by Patricia Cornwell
ISBN: 0684195976
ISBN13: 978-0684195971
language: English
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
ISBN: 0836893735
ISBN13: 978-0836893731
language: English
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction
ISBN: 0671786040
ISBN13: 978-0671786045
language: English
Subcategory: Mystery
ISBN: 0241114055
ISBN13: 978-0241114056
language: English
Subcategory: Europe
ISBN: 0552120413
ISBN13: 978-0552120418
language: English
Subcategory: Contemporary
ISBN: 0552105767
ISBN13: 978-0552105767
language: English