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e-Book New Graves at Great Norne (Perennial Mystery Library) download

e-Book New Graves at Great Norne (Perennial Mystery Library) download

by Henry Wade

ISBN: 0060808071
ISBN13: 978-0060808075
Language: English
Publisher: HarperCollins (June 1, 1986)
Pages: 303
Category: Mystery
Subategory: Thriller

ePub size: 1774 kb
Fb2 size: 1931 kb
DJVU size: 1584 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 847
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Chief Inspector Myrtle investigates a mysterious series of murders in the port town of Great Norne, and attempts to discover their connecting motive.

Chief Inspector Myrtle investigates a mysterious series of murders in the port town of Great Norne, and attempts to discover their connecting motive. ISBN13:9780060808075. Release Date:June 1986.

Start by marking New Graves at Great Norne as Want to Read . Published 1986 by Harper Perennial (first published 1947).

Start by marking New Graves at Great Norne as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. New Graves at Great Norne. Or so says one of the characters in Henry Wade's 1947 mystery set in a small East Anglian village where life has been fairly untouched by the progress of time between the World Wars. his death is put down as an accident. From all appearances, he missed his footing in a heavy fog and died from the blunt force of hitting his head on the quay-side stairs.

Great Norne is a small harbour town in East Anglia that once flourished with trade. Books related to New Graves at Great Norne. Now the quiet community is being terrorised by a series of murders: the vicar, Reverend Torridge is found dead on the quayside; then Colonel Cherrington is shot in his study. A third death follows. The last person to die violently in Great Norne was young Ellen Barton, who killed herself twenty years ago. But there are secrets in this close-knit, religious town - secrets that might provoke someone to bloody revenge  .

2 Detective and mystery books. Released for Death, 1938. New Graves at Great Norne, 1947. Diplomat’s Folly, 1951. Be Kind to a Killer, 1952

2 Detective and mystery books. Inspector Poole novels. Other novels He married Mary Augusta Chilton in 1911 and with her had 5 children:. John Henry Lancelot Aubrey-Fletcher (1912–1992). Be Kind to a Killer, 1952. Too Soon to Die, 1953. Gold Was Our Grave, 1954. The Litmore Snatch, 1957.

New Graves at Great NorneHenry WadeOriginally Published 1947 Earlier this year I discovered Henry Wade's inverted . The most important character in New Graves at Great Norne is not the sleuth or his victims but the town itself which feels utterly credible.

New Graves at Great NorneHenry WadeOriginally Published 1947 Earlier this year I discovered Henry Wade's inverted mystery novels and, as I am prone to do when I get rather excited, went out and bought pretty much every one of his novels in ebook format expecting I would power through them. Violent crime is next to unknown in the area and yet life ticks on for these characters.

Henry Wade was the pseudonym of Major Sir Henry Lancelot . Wade wrote both traditional and inverted mysteries, and published stories in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. New Graves at Great Norne (1947).

Henry Wade was the pseudonym of Major Sir Henry Lancelot Aubrey-Fletcher (1887-1969), English writer and baronet, who created Inspector John Poole. Wade was born in Surrey and educated at Eton and Oxford. He married Mary Augusta Chilton in 1911. Wade wrote both traditional and inverted mysteries, and published stories in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine there can be no doubt that Wade is one of the outstanding authors not only of the thirties, but also of the immediate post-war period. His novels are varied in plot and situation; they have wit, and his style is forceful and elegant. Diplomat's Folly (1951).

Detective and mystery books Inspector Poole novels. The Duke of York’s Steps, 1929.

When thirty-year-old English teacher Anna Emerson is offered a job tutoring . Callahan at his family's summer rental in the Maldives, she accepts without hesitation; a working vacation on a tropical island trumps the library any day. . Callahan has no desire to leave town, not that anyone asked him. June 1986 : USA Paperback.

Chief Inspector Myrtle investigates a mysterious series of murders in the port town of Great Norne, and attempts to discover their connecting motive
Comments:
JoJogar
St. Martha's of Great Norne is a beautiful church (now rarely filled) in an old-fashioned town. Its conservative congregation has aged along with its vicar, who has been there a quarter of a century. Younger church-goers now tend to gravitate to the newer nonconformist churches. Great Norne, an old East Anglian port town, has itself lost population and wealth over time, much of its coastal trade taken away by the railways and much of its farm trade taken by bigger towns with better roads. It's a town where not much happens, and that's how its people like it.

Early one November morning in 1938, however, the body of Reverend Theobald Torridge, Vicar of St Martha's, is found, the skull fractured, on the steps leading down to the harbor. The local police can only assume he lost his way in the fog and fell to his death the night before. At the inquest the broken whiskey bottle found in his pocket is never even mentioned. Long-time St. Martha's parishioners, even those who found him too strict, can hardly imagine life without him.

Then, on Christmas Eve, Colonel Cherrington, churchwarden and pillar of the congregation, shoots himself in the head with his old service revolver; his son-in-law hears the shot and finds him on the floor of his study. A detective from the county police notices a couple of details that don't quite fit the scenario. Very soon Chief Inspector Myrtle and Detective-Sergeant Plett (incognito) arrive from Scotland Yard. Young County Detective Joss is glad they've come; if this is a murder, it will be his first. The Colonel's heart was broken long ago when his wife ran away with a young soldier, and more recently he has lost thousands on bad investments. Are these motives enough for suicide?

This is a very richly imagined small town mystery: we get to know people in all walks of life, from church-goers, pub denizens and other townspeople to farmers who buy and sell at the market and fishermen who work out of the harbor, including a lot more about their past than they would want us to know. People do still remember the last violent death in Great Norne; it was twenty years earlier, when a young married woman killed herself after an affair with a sailor.

The deaths do not stop, each from a different cause, apparently unrelated, each a little less like accident or suicide and a little more like murder. Is there a connecting thread? Henry Wade excelled at writing about policemen of all ranks, serving various levels of government, local, county, and national, working together, at times disagreeing, each with his own strengths and weaknesses, to solve a complex, baffling case. This one requires not only powers of perception but also the wisdom of experience and the gift of local knowledge. But will even all this be enough?

Chilldweller
The evocative title first attracted me to this superb Golden Age mystery set in post-World War 2 England. Great Norne, the village, is atmospheric; the villagers are well-drawn, fleshed-out characters shrouded in mist, both literally and figuratively. The reader is privy to the thoughts of the police, the suspects and the potential victims. Multiple murders occur throughout the novel, each one more puzzling than the last. There are twists aplenty - I congratulated myself prematurely on solving the crimes when I was spectacularly mistaken. I will definitely be seeking out more Henry Wade novels.
NOTE: I read a used copy printed by Harper Perenniel in the 1980s and purchased from Amazon Marketplace but now I notice the used copies are very expensive so your best bet would probably be purchasing a Kindle copy.

Quphagie
Henry Wade, member of the famous Detective Club, belongs to the small circle of upper class British writers who invented the traditional mystery. This book written in 1947 is a typical example of this genre. Small town with its firmly defined class system, everything neat and tidy till the murder and then the paint chips of the idealistic, provincial picture. The forte of these old-fashined books is a puzzle and fairly distributed clues. The weakness are, almost always poorly sketched characters, hard to distinguish one from another.
"New Graves at Great Norne" is a delightful old mystery that I read with immense pleasure. I'll have to dig up more of this treasures from my vast collection.

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