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e-Book Ice download

e-Book Ice download

by Ed McBain

ISBN: 0330282964
ISBN13: 978-0330282963
Language: English
Publisher: Avon Books; First Printing edition (1984)
Pages: 288
Category: Thrillers and Suspense
Subategory: Thriller

ePub size: 1189 kb
Fb2 size: 1513 kb
DJVU size: 1892 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 877
Other Formats: lrf docx lit azw

Ed McBain (October 15, 1926 – July 6, 2005) was an American author and screenwriter. Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952.

Ed McBain (October 15, 1926 – July 6, 2005) was an American author and screenwriter. While successful and well known as Evan Hunter, he was even better known as Ed McBain, a name he used for most of his crime fiction, beginning in 1956. He also used the pen names John Abbott, Curt Cannon, Hunt Collins, Ezra Hannon, and Richard Marsten, amongst others. His 87th Precinct novels have become staples of the police procedural genre.

Praise for Ed McBain they were either too hot or too cold. The characters and events portrayed in this book are fictitious

Praise for Ed McBain they were either too hot or too cold. Like this winter, which had started in November instead of when it was supposed to. London was worse, she supposed. No, London was better. The characters and events portrayed in this book are fictitious. Any similarity to real persons, living or dead, is coincidental and not intended by the author. Printed in the United States of America.

This is the first book I've read by Ed McBain. He's a good writer and has some interesting characters, and I understand these characters repeat in other "87th Precinct" books. Ice" refers to cocaine, snow, freezing cold weather and diamonds. I didn't guess the ending. but I really don't know how to rate mysteries.

Ed McBain was one of the many pen names of the successful and prolific crime fiction author Evan Hunter (1926 - 2005)

Ed McBain was one of the many pen names of the successful and prolific crime fiction author Evan Hunter (1926 - 2005). Born Salvatore Lambino in New York, McBain served aboard a destroyer in the US Navy during World War II and then earned a degree from Hunter College in English and Psychology. After a short stint teaching in a high school, McBain went to work for a literary agency in New York, working with authors such as Arthur C. Clarke and . Wodehouse all the while working on his own writing on nights and weekends.

This is one of the best of over 50 87th Precinct novels by the late Ed McBain. it's longer than most of the books in the series, which gives the author the chance to develop a couple of interesting subplots and introduce some intriguing minor characters. McBain was a pioneer in the police procedural genre and the story here involves three murders of seemingly unrelated victims by the same gun.

Memorial Program (flash player needed). - 1/21/2009 MINSKY'S The musical MINSKY'S.

He published the first three books in the 87th Precinct series in 1956 under the name of Ed McBain.

Ice spills from the pockets of a dead diamond dealer. Ice runs through the heart of a cold-blooded killer and that of the players in a multimillion dollar show-biz scam. Ed McBain is a pen name for Evan Hunter who was born in 1926 in East Harlem, New York on October 15, 1926. Hunter was born with the name Salvatore Albert Lombino, and he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952. He published the first three books in the 87th Precinct series in 1956 under the name of Ed McBain. He also wrote juvenile books, plays, television scripts, and stories and articles for magazines.

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Ed McBain was an American author and screenwriter. He was born in October 1926 and passed away in July 2005, at the honorable age of seventy-eight.

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. Ed McBain was an American author and screenwriter. He was born under the name Salvatore Albert Lombino, however he legally changed his name in 1952 to Evan Hunter. Despite this, he is far better known under the name Ed McBain, due to the fact that this is author title on his wildly successful collection of crime fiction novels. Ed McBain was a born and bred New Yorker. He was lived in Harlem, New York City from when he was born until he turned twelve.

Ed McBain - the complete book list. The path to the truth is as slippery as ice-in a city whose heart is just as cold. The cops of this precinct know that anyone can be a victim. Ed McBain concocts a brilliant and intricate thriller about a master criminal who haunts the city with cryptic passages from Shakespeare, directing the detectives of the 87th Precinct to a future crime - if only they can figure out what he means. The Frumious Bandersnatch. Anyone can be a perp.

Comments:
Asyasya
This later entry in the series from McBain is one of the best of his now legendary 87th Precinct novels. Though it's cold outside for the boys of the 87th, Ice turns out to be something different from what you think.

There are some very true to life moments in this entry, many of them between Carella and the boys of the 87th Precinct as they try to connect a murder outside their precinct with another which happened on their turf. When no connection other than the weapon presents itself, the possibility that it might be random is even scarier.

For those who followed the series and are going through them again, or those who have just discovered Ed McBain, there is a lot going on here besides the cases. Kling is still reeling from a personal tragedy, which is explored in both his loneliness, and his budding relationship with the sweet yet tough undercover police woman, Eileen. Never one to shy away from grit and truth, this is also the notorious one where Eileen reveals to Kling a sexual fantasy she has which seems very much in contrast to her work undercover, which often involves posing as a prostitute.

The police procedural part of the story is very good, as it so often was, but it’s the dynamic between Eileen and Kling in this one you’ll remember most if you follow the series. Another excellent one in the long-running series of which we’ll sadly get no more, now that Ed McBain has passed. Great stuff.

Goldenfang
This is another very good entry in the 87th Precinct series. The title has multiple meanings and, as it would suggest, the story takes place during a brutally cold winter. As it opens, a dancer from a big show is walking home late at night. As she nears her apartment, someone steps out of the shadows and shoots her to death with a .38.

As it turns out, the same gun was used in the murder of a small-time drug dealer a week or so earlier. That case belongs to Steve Carella of the 87th Precinct, and since the two cases are obviously linked, the detectives of the 87th inherit the murder of the young woman as well, even though the crime did not occur within the boundaries of their precinct.

The detectives work diligently, but they can find no link between the two victims and no plausible suspects in either killing. Then another person is shot with the same gun and this victim would appear to have no relationship with either of the first two. It's all very confusing and suggests to the detectives that perhaps a crazy person is running around the city, killing people at random, which would be the worst possible thing that could happen.

In the meantime, Detective Bert Kling is still recovering from his recent divorce. He is definitely in emotional and psychological difficulty and is spending way too much time in the wee hours of the morning, lying awake and staring at his gun on the nightstand beside him.

All in all, it's a great tale. Thirty-six books into the series, McBain was clearly on a roll and fans of the series won't want to miss this one.

Taun
This is one of the best of over 50 87th Precinct novels by the late Ed McBain. it's longer than most of the books in the series, which gives the author the chance to develop a couple of interesting subplots and introduce some intriguing minor characters. McBain was a pioneer in the police procedural genre and the story here involves three murders of seemingly unrelated victims by the same gun. As the detectives of the 87th dig deeper into the case they discover a web of deceit that involves diamond smuggling, drug dealing and unethical practices in the business of putting on Broadway musicals.

The dialogue is sharp and fresh even after thirty years and the details of urban police work, as always, ring true. I've been a fan of McBain's books for over a quarter of a century and I re-read this one while recuperating from an illness. Reading the book was like a visit with old friends. I would highly recommend this book or any of McBain's novels to anyone who enjoys modern crime novels or police procedural stories.

terostr
This is a terrific story about a squad of police detectives given the assignment of solving a series of murders which might be related. The author does a nice job of conveying the logic behind the investigation whether it turns out to be accurate or just another dead end. Most of the focus stays on the investigation and while the personal lives of the officers does get attention the author doesn't permit that part of the story from distracting from the actual investigation. The conclusion does a nice job of tying things together in a reasonable fashion. This book is well worth your time and money.

Mightsinger
I have always enjoyed the 87th precinct books. Except for the technology being older they hold up well. I was able to read with interest without finding the lack of cell phones disturbing. The storyline is easy to follow and the characters are engaging. I have already purchased more in the series and look forward to reading them.

Mozel
A well told story with multiple suspects handled with balaced suspicion and exonerattion. Interrorgation scenes are well presented with slips the interrogator locks on to, and more subtle ones the reader is left to catch and interpret..Murders occur at a consistant pace. While the story builds toward a surprise at several points, like rising music in a western, the one that occurs is not the expected one.

Doukree
Great story line, good read. Didn't like the publication. When reading electronically there are a great many abrupt transitions where the scene changes without even the benefit of a blank line or two to indicate to the reader that the location or characters are different.

Begins a bit s!ow and purposefully off-track but tensions, along with the body count, grows. Great police dialogue, motive idea exchanges and fast paced interrogations. Typically McBain; a very good read.