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e-Book Tyrant: King of the Bosporus download

e-Book Tyrant: King of the Bosporus download

by Christian Cameron

ISBN: 1409104575
ISBN13: 978-1409104575
Language: English
Publisher: Orion (2011)
Category: Thrillers and Suspense
Subategory: Thriller

ePub size: 1753 kb
Fb2 size: 1157 kb
DJVU size: 1249 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 209
Other Formats: lit mobi rtf azw

King of the Bosphorus. Tyrant - 4 ). Christian Cameron. Telemon was one of the tyrant's senior captains. Idomenes passed the time reading aloud the list of ships from the marginal notes and their captains.

King of the Bosphorus. King of the Bosphorus. 311 BC. Eumeles sat at a plain table on a stool made of forged iron, his long back as straight as the legs on his stool and his stylus moving quickly over a clean tablet. He pursed his lips when he inscribed a sloppy sigma in the red wax, and he rubbed it out fastidiously and went back to writing his list of requirements. Most of his requirements had to do with money. Satyrus will command Black Falcon.

The tyrant of Athens has sent me a letter about i. Ben Zion shook his head Melitta’s first debate, first council and first absolute commands as lady of the Assagatje involved sending her allies home to their yurts. The irony was not lost on her. Ben Zion shook his head. I am one of the greatest grain merchants in the world, and no one knows my name outside the trade. Melitta’s first debate, first council and first absolute commands as lady of the Assagatje involved sending her allies home to their yurts. The presence of Parshtaevalt and Urvara had exactly the effect she had anticipated.

Satyrus heard the views of each of his officers and then made his own decisions, and it was a week after the mad symposium that he briefed them all on how he saw the winter.

Satyrus heard the views of each of his officers and then made his own decisions, and it was a week after the mad symposium that he briefed them all on how he saw the winter olden Lotus to Alexandria,’ he said. My people deserve to know that I am alive. Further, I need money in quantity and counsel. If I’m lucky, Diodorus will be home for the winter. We need our hired Macedonians – as marines first, and then as the core of our army.

King of the Bosphorus t-4 (Tyrant Christian Cameron. Year Published: 1997. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading. Year Published: 1991.

W: "Tyrant: King of the Bosporus" is the fourth book in the extended Tyrant series .

W: "Tyrant: King of the Bosporus" is the fourth book in the extended Tyrant series and the second book in the series that follows Satyrus and Melitta the children of the heroes of the original Tyrant duology - series that now seems to be planned at four volumes, making for a total of six Tyrant books all together - that started in Funeral Games.

These small farmers need some of the independence crushed out of them. We would grow more grain if we pushed out the Maeotae and used big estates – like Aegypt.

Christian Cameron King of the Bosphorus 311 BC Eumeles sat at a plain table on a stool made of forged iron, his long back as straight as the legs on his stool and his stylus moving quickly over a clean tablet. These small farmers need some of the independence crushed out of them. The tyrant turned to Idomenes. Contact our people in Olbia and tell them that it is time to be rid of our opponents there.

King of the Bosporus starts in 311 BC when Funeral Games ends and Satyrus and Melitta believe they are finally ready to take on Eumeles

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). King of the Bosporus starts in 311 BC when Funeral Games ends and Satyrus and Melitta believe they are finally ready to take on Eumeles.

Also by Christian Cameron The Tyrant Series Tyrant Tyrant: Storm of Arrows Tyrant: Funeral Games Killer of Men .

Also by Christian Cameron The Tyrant Series Tyrant Tyrant: Storm of Arrows Tyrant: Funeral Games Killer of Men Series Killer of Men Other Novels Washington and Caesar. Leon had stopped talking to his helmsman. He came to his rail and put his hands to his mouth.

Comments:
AnnyMars
Can't say that I was surprised at how good this historic fiction action novel was as I'm familiar with two of Cameron's other series and have become a great fan. The author is a master at describing battle scenes and providing amazing historic details to frame them. "King of the Bosporous" appears to be the climax of the Tyrant series and the story picked up nicely from its predecessors and went on to build wonderfully to the epic conclusion. I especially enjoyed the relatively obscure period of history (300's BC) that is the setting for the story. No need to provide storyline details as other reviewers have done that admirably.

The one thing that I would add here is that this a series that most folks (including me) believe should be read in chronological order. That would take the protagonists from the womb to their young adulthood, where they are in "King of the Bosporus"

Jack
Great book in one of my favorite series. Also a VG author, well worth following.

Solid 5-star rating.

I would like to provide textual content on that Rating as part of this Review, however am unable to do so. The ACDLT has restricted ability to Comment or Reply (without any prior warning, any specific notification, any identification of specific alleged problems or appeal).

That being so, an inability to respond to Review comments by others (positive, negative, indifferent) would be unfair to myself and others.

But it is a solid 5-star book in this genre.

in waiting
I can't say enough about this series. It really shocked me because I have a few favorites that have stayed at the top of my favorites list for years of reading a lot. Cameron has worked his way to being one of the best in my option. The Tyrant series has it all - Great story line , the best support character ever 'in my option' and you learn some amazingly true history. I don't like talking about the story on these things because I think stories are best told without giving anything away so I'll just say that there's plenty of strategy and action mixed with learning of ancient times.

Sharpmane
Satyrus and Melitta battle to establish their kingdom on the Black Sea as Alexander's successors fight one another for supremacy. Excellent!!

Andronrad
INTRODUCTION/OVERVIEW: "Tyrant: King of the Bosporus" is the fourth book in the extended Tyrant series and the second book in the series that follows Satyrus and Melitta the children of the heroes of the original Tyrant duology - series that now seems to be planned at four volumes, making for a total of six Tyrant books all together - that started in Funeral Games last year.

The original series that comprises of two books, Tyrant and Tyrant: Storm of Arrows follows the adventures of Kineas, an Athenian nobleman and commander of Alexander's allied Greek cavalry until he and his comrades are politely but summarily dismissed after the final defeat of Darius at Gaugamela in 331 BC.

Not welcome back in democratic Athens as both nobleman and "lackey of the Macedonians", Kineas is forced to find his fortune on the Black Sea as cavalry commander for the tyrant of Olbia; with a mixture of former and new comrades and allying himself with the Scythians Sakje, Kineas rises high in the Black Sea and contiguous steppes arena, though he is haunted by a prophecy about his final battle... And the Macedonians are coming both for the free Greek cities of the Black Sea in the West and to subdue the Scythians of the steppes in the East, so Kineas must face his former boss and idol, the Boy King and his Companions in battle.

This duology while hemmed a little by the prophecy which made the last several hundred pages a bit too predictable starts like a good but "I've seen this before" one, only to explode into one of the most memorable books about the era of Alexander with great characters, atmosphere and take-no prisoners attitude. Highly recommended.

Fast forward some 12-13 years later to 316 BC, seven years after Alexander's death when the fight for the pieces of his empire is intensifying and Tyrant: Funeral Games begins. Kineas' twin children with his Scythian warrior-princess wife are growing up with their mother who leads a mixed Greek-Scythian city founded by Kineas in the Black Sea hinterland. But when Eumeles, a former comrade of Kineas and now local bigwig, decides the three are a threat to his ambitions and brutally murders their mother Srayanka, the twins escape only due to the martial skills of their guardian, the Spartan warrior Philokles who was their father's best friend and companion.

Chased by Eumeles' minions led by the brutal Athenian mercenary Stratokles and getting involved in the wars of the successors, Satryus and Melitta find sanctuary in Alexandria at the court of Ptolemy, Alexander's former general who had some interesting encounters with Kineas in the original series. With the fortune of the African merchant Leon - another of Kineas' people - and the soldiers of Diodorus- one of Kineas' officers who kept to the mercenary business all this time - the two plan both revenge and to claim their inheritance and take the Black Sea cities from Eumeles, but first they have to help Ptolemy survive a challenge to his rule of Egypt from the most powerful of Alexander's generals Antigonus who wants nothing less than to recreate the full empire with him in command. And the fight that comes will be bloody and worth of the book title...

The story of Ptolemy's securing his rule in Egypt was also recounted in a slightly more fantastic setting in the wonderful Jo Graham novel Stealing Fire (FBC review).

King of the Bosporus starts in 311 BC when Funeral Games ends and Satyrus and Melitta believe they are finally ready to take on Eumeles. But Melitta is pregnant, so she is unwillingly confined to bed for a time, while Eumeles and his powerful allies have a long reach even to Alexandria, so he is prepared...

Before discussing why "King of the Bosporus" is another successful offering from the author, I would like to mention that Christian Cameron has started another wonderful series, this time about the turbulent era of the Persian Wars in the 490's-470's BC. The first volume published last fall, Killer of Men was another big time favorite which I have just missed reviewing here as I did with Funeral Games for that matter, but I plan to remedy this and review the sequel Marathon later this year when it will be published.

ANALYSIS: What makes Christian's Cameron historical fiction set in the Classical World in general and this book in particular stand out?

The first thing you notice when reading any Tyrant or Long War series book is the meticulous research and the pitch perfect atmosphere. No anachronisms here and also no "modern attitudes" from the characters which is one of my main turn-offs in the genre unless done extremely well in an ironical mode. The author's website linked above has a lot of "behind the scenes" information about the period in cause and how he chose this or that term, this or that scene and that adds considerable value too.

The novels are also page turners and relatively free of infodumps, so the recreation in depth mentioned above is incorporated seamlessly in the narrative and in each of the 5 books to date, I found myself compelled to keep reading as much as time would allow once I opened the respective book.

Getting down to the Satyrus and Melitta tetralogy and to King of Bosporus in particular, I would say that the main difference here is the youth and expectations of the main characters, though it is well tempered by the superb ensemble cast from the original duology as well as the new ones appearing here first.

The twins are born to relative privilege and expectations - the Scythians have a strong matriarchal component, so Melitta like her mother Srayanka could and (of course later would) become a warrior too, heir on her own to the Sakje "crown", while Satyrus could claim his Greek heritage in the Black Sea cities. Brutally thrown out of their normal life in a mixed Greek-Scythian milieu and running for their lives as 13 year olds tends to shape one's character and I think that the author managed to show that very well.

Satyrus alternates between overconfidence and insecurity, while Melitta tries to both emulate her mother's warrior heritage but also fit into the Greek world where "decent" women, especially of the upper classes, are expected to stay home, defer to men and run the household, rather than go and fight with bow and arrows on a trireme or on horseback and bed the men of their choice. It is true that their formative years in the "new life" are in Alexandria which at the time is a new city with less tradition than say Athens, but this "belonging and not belonging" at the same time is to me the main characteristic of the two main heroes of the tetralogy and shapes their actions to a large extent.

Like Funeral Games, King of the Bosporus is also almost end to end action, on sea, on land, on the steppes with naval battles, sacked cities, brutal killings, pirates, cavalry action, but also intrigue, camaraderie and the expected touch of the fantastic in the classical world style of blurring the line between reality and the supernatural.

Since this book has a lot of closure and in a sense concludes the main thread from Funeral Games, I am really curious where the series will go in the next two volumes announced for early 2012 and 2013, but King of the Bosporus (A+) is a book that fulfills the promise of the first volume and of the preceding duology in spades.

Note: all the aforementioned links appear on Fantasy Book Critic where this review has been first published.

Anararius
If you want to hate someone for not writing more, Mr. Cameron is your man.It is my belief he should simply be locked away to write night and day so that every day of my life I will have another page to turn in one of his works.
As soon as I become Tyrant, Mr. Cameron will be far more productive and the world will be a better place for it.
.

TheMoonix
Without giving anything away, BUY THIS BOOK! If you invested the time, effort, and enjoyment on the last three books, then BUY THIS BOOK! It's totally worth it.

Great writer and the story flows very well. interesting look at how things may have been years ago. a e

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