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e-Book The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street download

e-Book The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street download

by Sharon G. Flake

ISBN: 0545149673
ISBN13: 978-0545149679
Publisher: Scholastic; 1St Edition edition (2007)
Subategory: Unsorted

ePub size: 1663 kb
Fb2 size: 1581 kb
DJVU size: 1533 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 534
Other Formats: lit lrf mbr txt

Broken Bike Boy", then, proves that Flake's talent for switching genres is rivaled only by her strong . My name is Marie Queen Rousseau. I live in a castle on 33rd Street right across the street from the John Howard Housing Project.

Broken Bike Boy", then, proves that Flake's talent for switching genres is rivaled only by her strong characterizations. At first when I was reading this book, I was. well, basically I read this book like a kid would. My father named me Queen because he wanted everyone to know that his only daugh Whenever I stand in the corner, I close my eyes and see myself sitting on a throne in a long white gown with a giant ruby crown on my head. I love the way the author shows us how the relationship between the princess and the boy grows from one of dislike to something really special

Broken Bike Boy", then, proves that Flake's talent for switching genres is rivaled only by her strong characterizations. It's enough to drive even the most superior member of the royal family bonkers. Queen knows that she's smart. I love the way the author shows us how the relationship between the princess and the boy grows from one of dislike to something really special. You should get this book if you want to help your kids understand that even though some of us have more than others, we are all the same and we should always try to help each other. 4 people found this helpful.

Sharon G. Flake (born December 29, 1955) is an American writer of young adult literature. The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street (Jump at the Sun, 2007), illustrated by Colin Bootman. She has lived in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with her daughter for many years. She is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh with a BA in English. Her debut novel The Skin I'm In (1998) follows a young African-American girl who has issues with people teasing her about the color of her skin and the way she dresses. You Don't Even Know Me: Stories and poems about boys (Jump at the Sun, 2010). Pinned (Scholastic Press, 2012). Queen knows that she's smart

Broken Bike Boy", then, proves that Flake's talent for switching genres is rivaled only by her strong characterizations. Her father and her older brothers tell her every single day, and she loves correcting her teacher whenever she has the chance. That the kids in her school don't immediately recognize her innate superiority would be tolerable if they didn't all go and actually like nasty old Leroy instead. Leroy stinks and he lies.

Аудиокнига "The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street", Sharon Flake. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street", Sharon Flake. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Queen is a royal pain in the neck.

Queen is a royal pain in the neck. Her Highness treats everyone as though they were her loyal subjects: her classmates, her teacher, even her parents! When a new kid comes to Queen’s school, riding a broken bike and wearing run-over shoes, he immediately becomes the butt of everyone’s jokes. Queen’s parents insist she be nice to Leroy, but Queen doesn’t see why she should. Leroy isn’t just smelly; Queen thinks that he tells fibs–whoppers, in fact. And when he says he’s an African prince from Senegal, sparks begin to fly. Queen is determined to prove that Leroy is an impostor.

Fifth-grader Queen narrates this tale of classroom discord and community connections. by Sharon G. Flake & illustrated by Colin Bootman. She's pampered-awash in nice clothes, crowns and mirrors. She fancies her turreted home a castle-though it's just across from the John Howard projects. Father playfully reinforces her royal status at home, but at school, Queen's default demeanor is mean and smart-alecky. Flake won the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award for her first novel "The Skin I'm In" and is a. .Some of them may not be willing to read a book with a main character like Queen. But if they can give it a shot, it's a pretty enjoyable short novel. Flake won the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award for her first novel "The Skin I'm In" and is a two-time Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book winner. Beloved by children and adults, critics and booksellers, librarians and teachers, she is the author of a middle-grade novel and five books for young adults that have sold more than half a million copies. The mother of a college-age daughter, Flake writes full-time from her home in Pittsburgh.

Queen’s house?the biggest one on 33rd Street-looks just like a castle, and in her bedroom, she has dozens of.

Queen’s house?the biggest one on 33rd Street-looks just like a castle, and in her bedroom, she has dozens of beautiful dresses and crowns. Queen thinks she’s a real queen, and she treats everyone, even her teacher, like her royal subject. When a new kid comes to Queen’s school, riding a broken bike and wearing smelly, worn-out clothes, Queen joins her classmates in making fun of him. Her parents insist she be nice to Leroy, but Queen doesn’t see why she should. Leroy doesn’t just stink; Queen thinks he tells lies?whoppers in fact

I am a queen. Spoiled, smart, pretty, privileged, and mean, fifth-grader Queen Marie Rousseau has barely a friend at school-even the teacher dislikes her. Things change when she meets her knight in shining armor-the new kid, Leroy. He smells like moldy clothes and rides a rusty, broken bike, but he shows her a whole new world near his neighborhood projects. Queen knows Leroy is a fake when he says he is an African prince from Senegal, but then he brings gold coins and an elephant tusk to school. Are they real? Where did he get them? The mystery is fun, and even though the solution is a bit contrived and message-driven, Queen's arrogant, first-person, present-tense narrative brings readers along as she takes a voyage around the world that changes her. Queen's discovery, We are all from Africa, makes a great climax.
Comments:
Ziena
Great story to teach life lessons ..kindness, honesty, acceptance, diversity!

Pedar
good condition

Unde
Good story!!

Whitemaster
Queen is an incredibly stuck up ten-year-old girl whose family's praise has given her a very high opinion of herself. Her father and older brothers have spoiled her to the point where she's very, very easy to dislike. Unsurprisingly, no one at school seems to appreciate or recognize her supposed superiority.

Leroy is a new boy in her class, who smells funny and whose bike is broken. Queen is sure that he's a liar, especially when he tells stories about being royalty from Africa, and she can't stand him. Her parents try to force her to be nice to him, so they are thrown together despite Queen's dislike. Through Leroy, Queen learns some important lessons.

She's still not a very likeable heroine, though. I don't think I was supposed to like her. Be prepared for that going into this book, and you'll be able to appreciate Sharon G. Flake's amazing (and unsurprising if you've read her previous books) talent.

I'm not sure how kids will feel about this book. Some of them may not be willing to read a book with a main character like Queen. But if they can give it a shot, it's a pretty enjoyable short novel.

Reviewed by: Jocelyn Pearce

bass
I'm probably the laziest person I know when it comes to reviewing books. I'm okay on the reading part, and I'm just ducky at putting a book in my To Be Reviewed Pile. It's at the point when the book merges with the general pile that I tend to get distracted, though. Books get seriously frighteningly buried. I guess that's the danger with a vertical rather than a horizontal pile. Then the mediocre books begin to disappear from my mind. I forget their details and their characters. I can't conjure up a notable scene or moment from them, and then the end of the year rolls around and it's too late to review them anyway. Once in a great while, however, I'll bury a book deep down into my pile and it'll remain in my brain for months on end. Today's example of this is Sharon G. Flake's, "The Broken Bike Boy and the Queen of 33rd Street". I read this book so long ago that I've no clear-cut memory of the time or season anymore. Yet when I plucked it up just now it was if I'd finished it in its entirety only yesterday. Until this book the only Flake title I'd ever read was the mighty YA, Who Am I Without Him?. "Broken Bike Boy", then, proves that Flake's talent for switching genres is rivaled only by her strong characterizations.

It's enough to drive even the most superior member of the royal family bonkers. Queen knows that she's smart. Her father and her older brothers tell her every single day, and she loves correcting her teacher whenever she has the chance. That the kids in her school don't immediately recognize her innate superiority would be tolerable if they didn't all go and actually like nasty old Leroy instead. Leroy stinks and he lies. He says he's royalty from Africa, and Queen seems to be the only kid in her class that can see through his lies. Yet somehow this nasty boy has managed to charm everybody. Her teacher. Her parents. Her classmates. Everyone! But Queen's attempts to get at the truth behind Leroy's past teaches her a thing or two about what it truly means to be royal and, more importantly, a good person in this life.

At first when I was reading this book, I was ... well, basically I read this book like a kid would. I really did NOT like silly stuck-up Queen and I was feeling more than a little mad at Ms. Flake for forcing her upon me. I mean, this is a gal doted upon by her father and all her brothers. When one of them sends her a present she recounts how, "Then like always, he told me how much he loved me. Right after that I called my other brothers, to see what they would send me." ARG! Tell me that doesn't make you feel just a little crazy. Spoiled kids make for frustrating if intense reading. I'm ashamed to say that I was probably halfway through the book before it occurred to me that maybe you weren't supposed to like Queen. Maybe that was kind of the point. I've been so used to reading characters like Ida B from the novel of the same name that I had difficulty recognizing when I was supposed to be annoyed by my protagonist. Kudos to Ms. Flake then. It takes guts to make an unlikable hero. Guts and talent.

Pity about the end, really. Chapter 26 goes way too fast and ends the book with an abruptness that takes your breath away. Spoiler alert for those of you who'd rather not know the end. First of all, the villains are punks with pink hair. It's so retro it almost works. But then the action sequence starts and the herky-jerky writing throws everything off. For some reason, the style that serves the rest of the book so well goes wayward and odd here. Sentences are short and don't connect to one another in a pleasing fashion. Then the next thing you know you're at the end of the book and it's all happened so quickly that you don't know if you're coming or going.

Be all that as it may be, I'm a fan. The book sticks with you. Queen is so infuriating that it's nothing short of amazing that Flake is capable of making her sympathetic. The feeling of wanting to root for Queen even as you throttle her makes this book a standout in a fairly dull year. Ideal for booktalks, book discussion, and reading aloud in the classroom. Two thumbs up.

Malahelm
I read this one with my 5th grade son and this was actually a good book for boys too. I was kind of hesitant at first after looking at the cover with the girl but there are some really good points made in this story like not judging people by appearance. I love the way the author shows us how the relationship between the princess and the boy grows from one of dislike to something really special. You should get this book if you want to help your kids understand that even though some of us have more than others, we are all the same and we should always try to help each other.

Balhala
My daughter read this book and she liked it.

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