pbstudio
e-Book Gravy Training: Inside the Business of Business Schools download

e-Book Gravy Training: Inside the Business of Business Schools download

by Des Dearlove,Stuart Crainer

ISBN: 0787949310
ISBN13: 978-0787949310
Language: English
Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (July 30, 1999)
Pages: 338
Category: Management and Leadership
Subategory: Work and Money

ePub size: 1126 kb
Fb2 size: 1817 kb
DJVU size: 1326 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 292
Other Formats: mbr docx mobi azw

Crainer and Dearlove are both business journalists who live in Oxford, England; Crainer previously compiled The Ultimate Business Library (1997). In this critique of business education worldwide, no school escapes unscathed.

Crainer and Dearlove are both business journalists who live in Oxford, England; Crainer previously compiled The Ultimate Business Library (1997). They document a litany of complaints. Schools fail to provide any grounding in ethics or the human side of management.

See, for example, D. Whitford, " A New MBA for the E-Corp: Half-Geek, Half-Manager, at Bentley College they're breeding a new kind of corporate leader, " Fortune, 15 March 1999, 189–190, 192; and B. Fryer, " ComputerWorld's Third Annual Top Techno-MBA Survey, " ComputerWorld, 27 September 1999. Interestingly, none of the upper echelon schools examined in Gravy Training were ranked in ComputerWorld's top 25 schools. Management Education and Development Drift.

Stuart Crainer, (born in the 1960s) is a British management journalist and business theorist, adjunct professor at IE Business School. He is known for his work on the history and state of the art of management theory

Stuart Crainer, (born in the 1960s) is a British management journalist and business theorist, adjunct professor at IE Business School. He is known for his work on the history and state of the art of management theory. Early 1990s he co-authored his first management books with HR consultant David Clutterbuck and educator Eddie Obeng.

Gravy Training : Inside the Real World of Business Schools. I thought this book was bashing business schools. Teen and Young Adult. by Des Dearlove and Stuart Crainer. Select Format: Hardcover. Literature & Fiction. Mystery & Thriller.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Gravy Training: Inside the World's Top Business Schools. by. Stuart Crainer, Des Dearlove.

Gravy Training: Inside the Shadowy World of Business Schools. Ultimate Book of Business Brands: Insights from the World's 50 Greatest Brands (The Ultimate Series). 5 Mb. Скачать (pdf, . 5 Mb).

Summary of Gravy Training. Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove. Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove are . Many of today’s top business schools have become gravy trains, little more than cash cows for universities. based journalists with 20 years of business reporting experience. They co-founded the Suntop Media consulting firm.

Stuart Crainer & Des Dearlove. D/J and Book are in great condition. Published by Capstone, United Kingdom (1998). ISBN 10: 1900961687 ISBN 13: 9781900961684. Inside the shadowy world of business schools, Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove dig deep into the hugely successful but still mysterious world of business schools and ask whether the dreams they inspire and the careers they launch justify the millions of dollars spent by companies and individuals. You will receive the book seen in the image. Seller Inventory MC0243.

Gravy Training: Inside the Business of Business Schools. The Ultimate Book of Business Gurus is a completely original A-to-Z guide filled with 50 succinct biographies and 60 mini-profiles of the most fascinating and influential business thinkers - fro. ontinue Reading.

Are today's top business schools really crucibles of cutting-edge theory and management expertise? Or are they merely cash cows for universities and educators alike? In Gravy Training, two hard-hitting journalists uncover the inner workings of the world's top business schools, where the focus is often on generating huge enrollment fees and big-time consulting contracts for faculty. An intriguing mix of stories and hard data, Gravy Training clearly shows how many of our most revered business schools have reached a crucial crossroads in their development. The authors contAnd that, unsure of their role and facing intense competition, these schools must change dramatically if they are to survive. And they ask the hard questions these schools have so far failed to address.
Comments:
Androlhala
This is not a book about the business of business schools. It is a look at full-time MBA and executive (MBA) programs at the arguably best business schools in the world. This is like saying this is a study of the auto industry when all you have studied is Mercedes Benz. The real "business" of business schools must cover the part-time and undergraduate programs.
The authors bash b-schools for promoting a cult of gurus, only the authors also promote and quote gurus at every turn. And they use the same gurus to criticize the very schools that hire and promote them. The authors decry one-liners, only to close their work with a cliched one-liner of their own ("management is pocket science, not rocket science."). The authors tell b-schools to be customer-friendly but not to cater to the catering needs or accommodation interests of their clients. The authors purport to do a global study when this is at best a modest revision of a study of the elite European business schools. They imply (p. 186) that the AACSB only changed its name to International Association of Management Education outside the U.S., and this is not true. They criticize business deans for lacking vision, while not realizing that the "independent subcontractor" mode of business faculty is inconsistent with "academic leadership" creating a vision for such independent experts.
Business schools have been successful because they produce what businesses clearly prefer to hire: knowledge workers, managers and leaders for the global economy. Business students at all levels -- undergraduate, graduate and executive -- are learning the new culture and language of the new world economy. If b-schools were not the cash cows for universities that universities make them to be, or if as much were spent on training top business students as is spent on the college's star quarterback, we might have even more effective business schools. The fact that innovation and leadership is absent from the "top" schools is a phenomenon in all industries: the top schools become rich and self-satisfied and the real change bubbles up from those struggling, niche-building programs competing for the new customers' dollar. A well-trained manager may not be a rocket scientist, but if there are design flaws in his education, Challenger-like disasters are in the making. Business education is too big and too important to be left to a few, smug, incredibly expensive schools. And we should all be grateful that it is not...

Gaudiker
Nothing interesting at all here. You could do just as well by doing a search of recent Businessweek articles.

Domarivip
I originally wrote this review anonymously; 17 of 23 readers found the review helpful. Here is my update: The title is misleading: This is a look at full-time MBA and executive (MBA) programs at the arguably best business schools in the world. This is like claiming a study to be a study of the auto industry when all the authors studied is Mercedes Benz. The real "business" of business schools must cover the part-time and undergraduate programs. There are transparent inconsistencies: The authors bash b-schools for promoting a cult of gurus, only the authors quote and promote gurus repeatedly. They use the same gurus to criticize the very schools that hire and promote the supposed "guru". Crainer and Dearlove decry one-liners, then summarize their work with a cliched one-liner of their own: "Management is pocket science, not rocket science." They tell b-schools to be customer-friendly but not to cater to the catering needs or accommodation interests of their clients. They purport to do a global study when this is at best a modest revision of a study of the few, elite European business schools, which are generaly unlike the American business school system. They imply (p. 186) that the major business school accrediting body -- the AACSB -- only changed its name to International Association of Management Education outside the U.S., and this is not true. [NOTE: And AACSB in 2001 changed its name again -- worldwide.] They criticize business deans for lacking vision, while not realizing that the "independent subcontractor" mode of business faculty is inconsistent with "academic leadership" creating a vision for such independent experts. Business schools have been successful because they produce what businesses clearly prefer to hire: knowledge workers, managers and leaders for the global economy. Business students at all levels -- undergraduate, graduate and executive -- are learning the new culture and language of the new world economy. Even as the "new" economy declines and former dot commers return to collect their MBAs. Business is a liberal art, much like the study of a foreign language. At the undergraduate level, where most business education is done, accredited business schools demand a well-rounded, liberal arts curriculum. B-schools are generous cash cows for universities. Sure, their faculty earn a lot but they teach large course sections and generate demand for non-business courses. If as much were spent on training top business students as is spent on the college's star quarterback, we might have even more effective business schools. The fact that innovation and leadership is absent from the "top" schools is a phenomenon in all industries: the top schools become rich and self-satisfied and the real change bubbles up from those struggling, niche-building programs competing for the new customers' dollar. A well-trained manager need not be a rocket scientist, but if there are design flaws in his education, Challenger-like disasters are in the making. Business education is too big and too important to be left to a few, smug, incredibly expensive schools. And we should all be grateful that it is not...

Mojind
I thought this book was bashing business schools. However, it actually a well researched and balanced look at the growth of business schools.

ISBN: 027303197X
ISBN13: 978-0273031970
language: English
Subcategory: Higher and Continuing Education
ISBN: 0077107314
ISBN13: 978-0077107314
language: English
Subcategory: Politics and Government
ISBN: 0230280234
ISBN13: 978-0230280236
language: English
Subcategory: International
ISBN: 0682474193
ISBN13: 978-0682474191
language: English
ISBN: 0446529184
ISBN13: 978-0446529181
language: English
Subcategory: Job Hunting and Careers
ISBN: 143683581X
ISBN13: 978-1436835817
language: English
Subcategory: Small Business and Entrepreneurship
ISBN: 0787972754
ISBN13: 978-0787972752
language: English
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching
ISBN: 1578866774
ISBN13: 978-1578866779
language: English
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching
ISBN: 0910707189
ISBN13: 978-0910707183
language: English
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching
ISBN: 0375754636
ISBN13: 978-0375754630
language: English
Subcategory: Higher and Continuing Education