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e-Book The Age Of Innocence (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations) download

e-Book The Age Of Innocence (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations) download

by Sterling Professor of the Humanities Harold Bloom,Edith Wharton

ISBN: 0791081265
ISBN13: 978-0791081266
Language: English
Publisher: Chelsea House Pub (August 1, 2004)
Pages: 205
Category: Literature and Fiction
Subategory: Young Adult

ePub size: 1502 kb
Fb2 size: 1619 kb
DJVU size: 1867 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 772
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Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University.

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University. His most recent books include Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), a 1998 National Book Award finalist, How to Read and Why (2000), Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds (2002), Hamlet: Poem Unlimited (2003), Where Shall Wisdom be Found (2004), and Jesus and Yahweh: The Names Divine (2005). In 1999, Professor Bloom received the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Criticism. He has also received the International Prize of Catalonia, the Alfonso Reyes Prize of Mexico, and the Hans Christian Andersen Bicentennial Prize of Denmark.

This classic novel presents the coming of age of Pip (Philip Pirrip), one of. .Series: Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations (Hardcover). Hardcover: 187 pages.

This classic novel presents the coming of age of Pip (Philip Pirrip), one of Dickens's most memorable characters. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Critical essays reflecting a variety of schools of criticism - Notes on the contributing . Hardcover: 216 pages.

Critical essays reflecting a variety of schools of criticism - Notes on the contributing critics.

Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations. It is not a diet book but Healthy Weight Loss – Without Dieting Load more. 191 Pages · 2010 · . 3 MB · 856 Downloads ·English. Harold Bloom's introduction questions whether Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel. Lewis Carroll’s Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations). 13 MB·896 Downloads·New! Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing. It is not a diet book but Healthy Weight Loss – Without Dieting Load more similar PDF files.

One of Modern Libraries Best 100 books of the 20th Centruy.

Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations), Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle (Modern Critical Interpretations), Amy .

Authors: Harold Bloom, Neil Heims, Amy Sickets, Janet Larson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Great deals on one book or all books in the series. Authors: Harold Bloom, Neil Heims, Amy Sickets, Janet Larson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Related Series: Library of Literary Criticism, Bloom's Major Poets, Bloom's Notes, Bloom's Classic Critical Views, Bloom's Major Literary Characters.

Published by Chelsea House

ISBN 13: 9780791081266. The Age Of Innocence (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations). Somewhere in this book, Wharton observes that clever liars always come up with good stories to back up their fabrications, but that really clever liars don't bother to explain anything at all. This is the kind of insight that makes The Age of Innocence so indispensable. Published by Chelsea House. ISBN 10: 0791081265 ISBN 13: 9780791081266.

Harold Bloom Sterling Professor of the Humanities Yale University. Introduction 2003 by Harold Bloom. Blooms modern critical views) Includes bibliographical references and index. 2003 by Chelsea House Publishers, a subsidiary of Haights Cross Communications. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Printed and bound in the United States of America. ISBN: 0-7910-7399-8 1. Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich, 18181883-Criticism and interpretation.

Harold Bloom's introduction questions whether Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel that will .

Harold Bloom's introduction questions whether Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel that will endure or has had popularity merely as a time.

A critical overview of the work features the writings of Cushing Strout, David Holbrook, Kathy Miller Hadley, John J. Murphy, Clar Virginia Eby, and and other scholars, discussing the themes and characters of the novel.
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THE AGE OF INNOCENCE

Although this is a love story on many levels, The Age of Innocence, by Edith Wharton, is, also, a documentary of a culture- in this case, the elite rich society of New York in 19th century America- who buries its own dreams and deepest desires behind the greater need to be accepted and approved by one’s own ‘reference group.’ The book hinges on the words people are “chained to separate destinies,” and proceeds to illustrate how this is true of rich and poor alike.

This star-crossed love story centers on a love triangle. Rebelling against a long-time, smothering tradition, a young, idealistic man, Newland
Archer, marries his loving and sweet-natured-but, boring and traditional- wife, May, under pressure from friends and family. The complication comes when he falls head over heels in love with his wife’s cousin, the Countess Ellen Olinska, who has recently come home. To the disapproval and shock of her family and New York society she has deserted her husband, a rich, albeit unsavory French Count.

The Countess is a beautiful Bohemian ‘outcast’ central to the story because she dares to have the courage to reject that which is destructive to her true nature, making her misunderstood by her family and friends. However, her integrity, compassion, and joie de vivre make her a sympathetic and irresistible character to all who know her, especially the men, who fall under the spell of her charms and are depicted as being in a much better positon to flout the chains of society in contrast to the women of the time.

Archer loves the Countess Olenska because she possesses the attributes he most wants himself, and she is a metaphor for freedom of choice in that she defies the expectations of her sex and the confines of society in exchange for being true to her own ideas of integrity and proper behavior.

A heart-wrenching story of unrequited love, it depicts the forces that band together to bring the protagonists to heel and keep them chained to separate destinies. Their personal desires are squelched by family and friends in the name of dutiful honor and expectations amidst the rigid judgment and hypocrisy of their unyielding, self-righteous social class.

Edith Wharton was a master at evoking the social mores and confines of the society she grew up in, and is often a society that she seems to condemn for its snobbery and hypocrisy.

Even though the book depicts New York’s upper crust of the 19th century, it is ‘everyman’s story,’ because it’s a reminder to us all that, although we can exist in a world to which we may not want to belong, our choice to remain there may come at the steep and personal price of dream walking through life. This story is so beautifully written and is evocative of human nature which demands that men and women put duty, honor, and pride above all else regardless of individual liberty and personal happiness.

In the concluding pages, the reader has an epiphany that one comes to terms with the sweet fragileness of our memories by consciously choosing to reject choices that may expose and destroy perceived perfection in order to maintain the dream of what might have been. So, it is with Archer. He, at last, accepts that he gave up something dear to him for the greater good. And, as he moves into mid-life, fate helps him to accept that it may have been the right decision, after all.

The Age of Innocence is a story that will resonate with anyone who suffers and pines over the one that got away in the blush of youthful love. It remains a story for the ages and serves as reminder that we cannot always direct the course of love, because love takes many forms, and often wounds us. But, a life lived fully requires understanding and accepting love’s many manifestations.

Landarn
It was a glittering, sumptuous time when hypocrisy was expected, discreet infidelity tolerated, and unconventionality ostracized.

That is the Gilded Age, and nobody knew its hypocrises better than Edith Wharton.... and nobody portrayed them as well. "The Age of Innocence" is a trip back in time to the stuffy upper crust of "old New York," taking us through one respectable man's hopeless love affair with a beautiful woman -- and the life he isn't brave enough to have.

Newland Archer, of a wealthy old New York family, has become engaged to pretty, naive May Welland. But as he tries to get their wedding date moved up, he becomes acquainted with May's exotic cousin, Countess Ellen Olenska, who has returned home after dumping her cheating husband. At first, the two are just friends, but Newland becomes more and more entranced by the Countess' easy, free-spirited European charm.

After Newland marries May, the attraction to the mysterious Countess and her free, unconventional life becomes even stronger. He starts to rebel in little ways, but he's still mired in a 100% conventional marriage, job and life. Will he become an outcast and go away with the beautiful countess, or will he stick with May and the safe, dull life that he has condemned in others?

There's nothing too scandalous about "Age of Innocence" in a time when starlets acquire and discard boyfriends and husbands like old pantyhose -- it probably wasn't in the 1920s when it was first published. But then, this isn't a book about sexiness and steam -- it's part bittersweet romance, part social satire, and a look at what happens when human beings lose all spontaneity and passion.

Part of this is due to Wharton's portrayal of New York in the 1870s -- opulent, cultured, pleasant, yet so tied up in tradition that few people in it are able to really open up and live. It's a haze of ballrooms, gardens, engagements, and careful social rituals that absolutely MUST be followed, even if they have no meaning. It's a place "where the real thing was never said or done or even thought."

And Wharton writes distant, slightly mocking prose that outlines this sheltered little society. Her writing opens as slowly and beautifully as a rosebud, letting subtle subplots and powerful, hidden emotions drive the story. So don't be discouraged by the endless conversations about flowers, ballrooms, gloves and old family scandals that don't really matter anymore.

In the middle of all this, Newland is a rather dull, intelligent young man who thinks he's unconventional. But he becomes more interesting as he struggles between his conscience and his longing for the Countess. And as "Age of Innocence" winds on, you gradually see that he doesn't truly love the Countess, but what she represents -- freedom from society and convention.

The other two angles of this love triangle are May and Ellen. May is (suitably) pallid and rather dull, though she shows some different sides in the last few chapters. And Ellen is a magnificent character -- alluring, mysterious, but also bewildered by New York's hostility to her ways. And she's even more interesting when you realize that she isn't trying to rebel, but simply being herself.

"Age of Innocence" is a subtle look at life in Gilded Age New York, telling the story of a man desperately in love with a way of life he hasn't got the courage to pursue. Exquisite in its details, painful in its beauty.

ISBN: 1555460216
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language: English
Subcategory: History and Criticism
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e-Book William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations) download

William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations) epub fb2

by William Shakespeare,Sterling Professor of the Humanities Harold Bloom
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language: English
Subcategory: Education and Reference
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